eNews: MN Monthly Recap Sep 2021: RDOF, Fall Conference and Opportunities

Save the Date (Oct 12-14)! Building on Broadband: Inspiring Progress
The Blandin Foundation is pleased to announce the dates for the virtual fall broadband conference of Oct 12-14. There will be a series regional events leading up to the statewide conference. We are looking for presenters (like you) who have an inspirational story of broadband use. Please submit an idea!

FCC doles out some RDOF funding
The FCC announced several (but not all) Federal RDOF broadband awards. Two winning bidders in MN were given the green light (Consolidates and Farmers) and one was asked and then did withdraw one project (Aspire). Nothing was said about LTD Broadband in Minnesota; although LTD was given red and yellow lights in other states. CNS has created an interactive map that tracks the new awards. The RDOF announcement was a hot topic on the July Digital Use Lunch Bunch topic as well in various publications.

MN Broadband Task Force July 2021
The MN Broadband Task Force heard from the MN Office of Broadband Development; because new funding for grants will be coming from federal sources, the funds will likely not be released in 2021. They also heard from the State Connected & Automated Vehicles Office and their need for fiber and from CNS about their interactive broadband maps.

New Blandin Cohort to Work on Broadband

Arrowhead Intelligent Region (AIR) initiative brings together northeastern Minnesota economic and community developers to identify and fund projects across the seven-county Arrowhead region that will:

  • improve broadband infrastructure
  • build a knowledge workforce
  • incent innovation
  • ensure digital equality
  • enable community engagement
  • ensure environmental and social sustainability

Policy Issues (in reverse chronological order)

COVID News

Vendor News

Research & Tools

Local Broadband News

Dakota County
Dakota County Broadband Report 2020

Fargo/Moorhead
702 Communications Announces new Internet Exchange, FMIX

Fridley
Fridley storm shelter also used as learning hub and literacy center

Hennepin County
Hennepin County board authorizes $10M toward eliminating digital divide

Kandiyohi County
Kandiyohi County to focus federal funding (ARP) on broadband

Le Sueur County
Asset mapping in Le Sueur County includes broadband plans

Mankato
Mankato Free Press on rural wins in Legislature

Mankato getting more fiber with Consolidated and faster downloads with Spectrum

Northern MN
How can broadband help with these wild fires?

Internet Speeds up to 10 Gigabits Coming to Northern Minnesota

Rochester
Mayo’s video visits up 5000 percent but how does that impact Rochester’s local economy?

Southeast MN
Sen Klobuchar says infrastructure bill will help get broadband to Southeast Minnesota

Thief River Falls
AT&T deploying 5G in areas around Thief River Falls, Marshall and North Shore MN

Upcoming Events, Opportunities and Resources

Stirring the Pot –

Blandin Foundation offers a couple approaches for communities wanting to work on broadband access and use. The Foundation is recruiting communities right now for both approaches.

Blandin Broadband Communities (BBC) – The BBC program requires a community team – City, County, School District, Tribal Government, or multi-county region – to work on both broadband access and use over an 18-24 month period. Communities receive leadership education, facilitation and grant resources to plan and implement projects that improve broadband access and use. This might include anything from wi-fi hotspots to e-commerce assessments and training to tele-health to training elders. Each community receives up to $75,000 to implement projects. Projects must fall into one or more of the six Intelligent Community framework, including broadband, workforce, innovation, digital equity, sustainability and/or community engagement. Blandin has worked with more than 40 communities on this program and the results always surpass expectations, even in this virtual environment.

Community Broadband Resources: Accelerate! – This program is focused on equipping your community broadband team to successfully plan and implement broadband infrastructure projects. Over a 16-week timeframe, community teams watch online broadband webinars, then meet Friday mornings for two hours to learn more about that week’s topics and plan the upcoming broadband development efforts.  Through the program, community teams conduct surveys, interview incumbent and prospective providers, develop consensus around local broadband partnership and finance strategies, etc.  We have just completed our first cohort of four county/tribal communities and now these communities are off and running on prospective broadband public-private partnership projects, including the pursuit of federal grants.

If you are interested in either of these programs, please contact Bill Coleman at 651-491-2551 or bill@communitytechnologyadvisors.com. Application timelines on both programs are short, so do not delay.

Aug 25 Lunch Bunch: Discussion on Basic Broadband

Each month the Blandin Foundation hosts two conversation or lunch bunch sessions; on the second Wednesday of the month the focus is Infrastructure and on the fourth the focus is Digital Inclusion and Use.

There will only be one lunch bunch in August on August 25. We are inviting in an academic who is looking into the idea of the basic broadband. I think it will be a lively conversation.

Register here.

Event notes: Lunch Bunch on Fall broadband conference, FCC RDOF announcements and more

This month’s Digital Use and Equity Lunch Bunch was a little scattered because we intersected with the MM Broadband Task Force monthly meeting. I’m sharing the video because a lot of good conversation happened. At the highest levels we talked about what people would like to see happen at the Fall Broadband conference. We’re looking for folks to propose topics on which to present or a topic you’d like us to tackle. How to use federal funding for broadband was a hot topic.

We also touched upon the latest announcement from FCC on RODF funding. We learned that Consolidated and Farmer’s got funding, that Aspire stepped back from funding and that LTD is on notice in some states but not word in Minnesota.

EVENTS TODAY: MN Broadband Task Force & Blandin Lunch Bunch

A reminder to check out the Task Force meeting this morning and then join us for a late Lunch Bunch to talk about it…

Each month the Blandin Foundation hosts two conversations or lunch bunch sessions. This month the second Lunch Bunch, which focuses on Digital Use and Inclusion, falls on the same day of the MN Broadband Task Force meeting. The Task Force goes from 10am to 12:30 pm. The Lunch Bunch goes from noon to 1pm. So I had an idea. I propose that folks join me at the Task Force (when you can) and that we meet for Lunch Bunch after.

The Task Force holds space at the end of each meeting for public comments. They almost never get comments but I think they would be well served by hearing from folks on the frontlines who need better broadband. So if you have a story to share – I especially invite you to join me in the meeting. If you are interested in watching but not being seen, I livestream the meetings on Facebook too.

Once the Task Force meeting ends, I will pop into the Lunch Bunch meeting and Mary Magnuson has kindly offered to hold open that space until I get there. And I figure we can talk about the Task Force meeting and/or anything related to the Task Force. Over the years I have attended most of the Task Force meetings through the many iterations of the group.

Register now!

EVENT July 28: Lunch Bunch join the Task Force then chat after

Each month the Blandin Foundation hosts two conversations or lunch bunch sessions. This month the second Lunch Bunch, which focuses on Digital Use and Inclusion, falls on the same day of the MN Broadband Task Force meeting. The Task Force goes from 10am to 12:30 pm. The Lunch Bunch goes from noon to 1pm. So I had an idea. I propose that folks join me at the Task Force (when you can) and that we meet for Lunch Bunch after.

The Task Force holds space at the end of each meeting for public comments. They almost never get comments but I think they would be well served by hearing from folks on the frontlines who need better broadband. So if you have a story to share – I especially invite you to join me in the meeting. If you are interested in watching but not being seen, I livestream the meetings on Facebook too.

Once the Task Force meeting ends, I will pop into the Lunch Bunch meeting and Mary Magnuson has kindly offered to hold open that space until I get there. And I figure we can talk about the Task Force meeting and/or anything related to the Task Force. Over the years I have attended most of the Task Force meetings through the many iterations of the group.

Register now!

EVENT July 14: Lunch Bunch: Infrastructure chat

Each month the Blandin Foundation hosts two conversation or lunch bunch sessions. The first Lunch Bunch in July happens tomorrow at noon (July 14). It will be an open topic. SO bring in any questions, stories or ideas that you want to explore!

Blandin Broadband Lunch Bunch on Wednesday, July 14 at noon.  Register now!

Arrowhead Intelligent Region: Program Update

The Arrowhead Intelligent Region (AIR) initiative brings together northeastern Minnesota economic and community developers to identify and fund projects across the seven-county Arrowhead region that will:

  • improve broadband infrastructure
  • build a knowledge workforce
  • incent innovation
  • ensure digital equality
  • enable community engagement
  • ensure environmental and social sustainability

The latest AIR cohort just got started on their path to better broadband, and I thought it might be fun for folks to get a glimpse on what’s happening there…

Turtle Island Communications Inc. company brings broadband Indian Country

The Circle posts an article highlighting Turtle Island Communications Inc. and its founders, Madonna Peltier Yawakie and her husband Melvin (Mel) Yawakie.  Madonna was on the Blandin Broadband Strategy Broadband for many years. She and Mel attended several Fall broadband conferences. I have always been impressed and amazed at their depth of knowledge in building broadband. I have worked most with Madonna, who seems to understand every financial opportunity and every policy implication for tribal communities. I have seen her lift the flag again and again to make sure that tribal areas are seen, mapped and subsequently wired.

I’m pleased to share an abridged version of the article, starting with the basics…

For Madonna Peltier Yawakie and her husband Melvin (Mel) Yawakie, it is practically a meaningless question. But it does strengthen public awareness of the important work their Turtle Island Communications Inc. company does in Indian Country.

The background…

She is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa in North Dakota. He is Pueblo Zuni from the Southwest. Both grew up in families where calling a relative a few miles away could be an expensive long distance telephone call.

Their roles and start in broadband…

“You don’t just wake up one day and say, “Let’s start a business,” Madonna said. “We’ve seen the need for most of our lives.”

Both had extensive telecommunications backgrounds and were painfully aware of disparities between the communities their prior employers served with modern communications and what was available in their home communities. They both had proper educational backgrounds to step in and serve Native American tribes.

Madonna said she thought she would want to work on economic development for tribes when she went off to college. Following that objective, she received a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and a Master’s degree in Community and Regional Planning from North Dakota State University (NDSU).

She serves as president of the family-owned company which allows her to continue her original goal although from a highly skilled, technical perspective.

Mel is vice president of the company and heads engineering, planning, construction and project management. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from NDSU, and an Associate degree in Electronic Technology from what is now Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kan.

In that role, he leads in planning, designing and implementing both wireline services and wireless telecommunication systems for the tribally owned broadband, high-speed communications systems.

The Yawakies started TICOM exactly 20 years ago. Their first big project was for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in the Dakotas.

This became a learning experience in itself, Madonna said.

eNews: MN Monthly Recap July 2021: funding, definitions and updates

Save the Date (Oct 12-14)! Building on Broadband: Inspiring Progress
The Blandin Foundation is pleased to announce the dates for the virtual fall broadband conference of Oct 12-14. There will be a series regional events leading up to the statewide conference and there is a request for presenters from folks like you who have an inspirational story of broadband use.

Broadband view from MN Communities
The Blandin Broadband team checked in with a BBC initiative to look back at what I’ll optimistically call the tail end of the pandemic and a helpful look at what everyone is expecting moving forward.

The Digital Divide Remains
Roughly a quarter of adults with household incomes below $30,000 a year (24%) say they don’t own a smartphone. About four-in-ten adults with lower incomes do not have home broadband services (43%) or a desktop or laptop computer (41%).

MN Broadband Task Force June 2021
The Minnesota Broadband Task Force met. They heard from Arc Minnesota on the impact of broadband (good and bad) on people with autism and other disabilities. They also heard from someone from the FCC on the ins and outs on the Emergency Broadband Benefits. They got an update on broadband in the MN legislature, combined with a comment at the end meeting on federal funding.

Understanding broadband speed tests
In June, Blandin Foundation hosted a discussion on different types of broadband speed tests and mapping in Minnesota. It became clear that different tests will provide different results because their purposes are different.

States go through stages to fund broadband: MN lifted as early adopter
The Benton Institute posts an article from CTC Energy and Technology on the steps that state take to fund local broadband efforts. They outline three stages: develop an overall broadband plan, design the structure and rules of their broadband funding and execute grant strategies and then revise and adjust as needed. They call out the Minnesota model.

State Policy Issues (in reverse chronological order)

Federal Policy Issues (in reverse chronological order)

COVID News

Vendor News

Local Broadband News

Arrowhead Region
Blandin, Northland, IRRRB helps Arrowhead leaders focus on broadband
Arrowhead Regional Leaders Collaborate on Broadband Projects

Bemidji
Quarantine rules help spread telehealth options for rural moms-to-be in Bemidji

Ely
New FirstNet Cell Site Primarily Powered by Solar Launches on Echo Trail to Support First Responders in Northern Minnesota

Greenwood Township
Greenwood Township is looking at options for better broadband

Hermantown
Hermantown announces a Broadband Task Force

Northern MN
Will Enbridge tax snafu impact broadband investment in Northern MN?

Kandiyohi County
Kandiyohi County commits $1.3 million ARP funding to broadband

Pipestone County
Pipestone County thinks about American Rescue Plan – broadband comes up

Redwood and Kandiyohi Counties
MVTV covering campgrounds in Kandiyohi and Redwood Counties

Rochester
Mayo Clinic’s new mobile health bus for medical services and broadband access

Winona
HBC offers free internet to guests in transitional housing in Winona

Upcoming Events, Opportunities and Resources

Stirring the Pot – guest post by Steve Giorgi, Director of Range Association of Municipalities & Schools (RAMS)

I know many of you are used to reading commentary from Bill Coleman, a well know broadband enthusiast who works tirelessly for communities across the state to enhance their broad connectivity.  Well, Bill is on a well-deserved vacation, and I was asked to try and fill in during his absence.  I am taking a different approach and asking you to PONDER THIS….

The following are summaries of some of the broadband activities happening across the country.  When I read these articles, I often find myself asking. “Why not in Minnesota?”  Perhaps you will think the same thing and if enough of us start asking that question, who knows we may start a movement….

In Georgia, Conexon Connect, led by Jonathan Chambers, secured over $1 billion dollars from a federal grant program by creating a consortium of electrical cooperative who will deliver fiber to the premise for their cooperative members.  The mission is to serve 100% of the membership with gigabit fiber service by utilizing existing power line easements and access to the rural members. Conexon has designed over 100,000 miles of fiber networks, builds more than 30,000 miles of fiber per year and has connected over 50,000 cooperative members to fiber.  The engagement of our electric cooperatives in Minnesota seems to me to be the ultimate solution to getting all Minnesotans connected to quality broadband services.  If they can provide electricity, they can provide fiber.  Conexon will work with any cooperatives anywhere in the country – WHY NOT MINNESOTA?  Minnesota is home to 44 electric cooperatives and to date only 5 have engaged in broadband services.  Ponder that….

Just last month Governor Jay Inslee from the State of Washington signed into law the Public Broadband Act that removed all restrictions on public broadband networks in the state.  That leaves 17 states that have laws on the books that limit or restrict publicly owned and operated broadband networks.  In Minnesota a community is required to hold a referendum and achieve a super majority vote with 65% support before undertaking the design and build out of a public broadband network.  WHY IS THAT?  One could speculate about the lobbying of cable providers and others who may not want public competition, but that discussion is for another day.  Let’s examine the first public network that provided symmetrical gigabit service for an entire city…Chattanooga Tennessee!  In 2010 the city committed $220 million dollars to build and deploy gigabit fiber services within the entire community.  The resulting job explosion has been eye opening and Chattanooga is home now to numerous data centers (cloud storage) that provides a steady influx of tax revenue for the city.  As a matter of fact, a study conducted by the University of Tennessee determined that in one decade since the deployment of fiber the city has gained over $2.69 BILLION dollars in revenue.  Could Minnesota be a mecca for data centers? Absolutely, if we deployed fiber networks.

This year the MN legislature agreed to provide $70 million for the Office of Broadband over the next two years ($35 million each year).  The funding is primarily from the Federal America Rescue Plan funds allocated to the state to address the myriad of issues resulting from the COVID 19 pandemic.  This will be the largest infusion of dollars toward broadband in the state and hopefully will be able to navigate the mishmash of locations eligible for “state” funds not already designated to receive RDOF funding.  Sorry, this gets complicated.  In any event, it sounds like Minnesota has finally recognized that a significant investment in broadband is necessary to get more Minnesotans connected.  157,000 families have been identified as being underserved or not served.  Then we see what is happening in California where Governor Newsom announced his plan to invest $7 BILLION in the largest public broadband system in the nation.  Once again, I ponder WHY NOT HERE?

Well, I think Bill will be back next month and your regular readings will return.  In the interim perhaps I left you a few things to ponder over.  Hope you had a great 4th of July celebration, keep the faith, and know that there is a small army of broadband advocates on the Iron Range working hard to bring home those last mile connections.

Peace Out

Steve Giorgi

Wisconsin Broadband Office gives a nice nod to the Blandin Foundation

The Wisconsin Broadband Office annual report gives a nice nod to the work of the Blandin Foundation under their examples of active network building and community alignment…

Minnesota-based philanthropy the Blandin Foundation stands with Minnesota’s rural leaders and communities as they create and claim futures that are resilient, vibrant and connected. Since 2003, the Blandin Community Broadband Program has engaged at local, state and federal levels to ignite and sustain policies that support rural access to robust broadband…

 

 

 

 

Lunch Bunch Notes: understanding different types of broadband speed and performance tests

Thank you to everyone who attended and made richer the discussion on speed tests today. Speeds tests are just one deep dive into what makes broadband technology and policy hard to follow. It gets wonky quickly but it matters. It matters if you want the broadband you pay for in your home. It matters if you live in a community without adequate broadband and want to seek public funding to improve access. It matters if you are a policymaker and need to decide where to invest in broadband to best help your constituents. It matters if you are relocating your home or your business and you want to know where the best broadband can be found.

Today we had some generous experts really get into the details – special thanks to Glenn Fishbine (Geo Partners), Travis Carter (USI) Steve Howard (Paul Bunyan) and Diane Wells (Office of Broadband Development). We spoke a lot about the speed test sponsored by MN Broadband Coalition and hosted by Geo Partners.

I learned a lot and I hope to follow up with more discussions – but at a very high level we learned that speed tests are not all the same. Sites like Ookla’s Speed Test measure the speed of the connection or the circuit. They will give you the best case scenario – like how fast it might be for you to get to a big site like Netflix. Where as the GEO Partner test in Minnesota, which aligns more with MLab testing, tries to mimic a more complete experience that takes into consideration things like wanting to connect to a site that might have a lesser online presence (be off network). So they test worst case scenario. Also they are focused on testing speeds in communities that generally don’t have good broadband – so less than 25 Mbps down and 3 up. They don’t distinguish enough between providers that serve a symmetrical Gig versus someone with a 200/20 connection.

Both serve a purpose – but we need to make those distinctions better known. Another factor is that the Geo Partner test server is in Virginia – rather than being closer to Minnesota so already it sort of starts off slow from the blocks. You can listen to the discussion for more details. I will do a deeper dive later. There was an offer on the table from Travis to help get the GEO Partner server onto MICE, a Midwest Internet exchange point, which would bring the testing closer to the source. And there was interest from Glen in looking into getting the server closer.

EVENT TODAY (noon) Lunch Bunch – MN speed tests and mapping

Just a reminder of today’s lunch bunch. We’re going to be talking about speed tests. I’ preparing for the discussion and ran into what appears to be a pretty good outline of speed test topics. I can hear from the experts if it is in line with their thinking. Otherwise here’s the original post about the meeting…

Speed tests connect users, providers and policymakers.

Speed tests are tools that households can use to let broadband providers and policymakers know what they are experiencing. They are used to create maps that help providers decide who needs better broadband, help policymakers decide who needs attention and people decide where to relocate homes or businesses. But what do we do when different tests show different results? What do different tests consider? And what are contributing factors?

We have a few folks on the frontlines willing to come to talk to us about the tests and we want to hear from you. What are you experiencing? Do you have questions?

Pleased to have folks from Geo Partners (Glenn Fishbine and Paul Demming) and a few providers (Travis Carter from USI) and hopefully Steve Howard from Paul Bunyan (based on availability) join us for the conversation.

Register now!

Save the Date! Building on Broadband: Inspiring Progress

From the Blandin Foundation; this is a fun opportunity for anyone to speak up and tell your inspiring story, show us your innovation or ask us to get someone to speak to you…

Mark Your Calendar!
October 12-14, 2021

#mnbroadband

For our 2021 virtual broadband conference, we want to hear from YOU!

Yes, as the pandemic wanes, we’re planning another online broadband conference for 2021. But hear us out. This will not be a nine-hour webinar!

We want this conference to be your chance to be heard, and to interact with others from around the state. What’s the best thing you’ve experienced/learned around broadband or technology this year? What have you been working on? What has inspired you? If presenting isn’t your thing, don’t worry – suggest a TED talk we can discuss, pose an open space question, or better yet make your own short video. The sky’s the limit! See the Request for Proposals and submit your idea today!

Next, attend one of eight regional meetings being planned around the state to share your broadband story, to learn about the state of broadband, and plans around Federal funding opportunities in your neck-of-the-woods.

Finally, join us online for a 3-day, statewide event to hear what’s happening across the state – what is being accomplished, what is still needed, and how we can inspire each other to keep at it!

This year, we’ve all lived through a shared, but unique, experience. What was yours like? How did broadband help or hinder – or motivate – you, or your community?

We know rural Minnesotans keenly felt how important a strong, reliable broadband connection is. When kids can’t go to school, adults can’t work, and families can’t access needed resources, our communities suffer. By working together, though, our communities can forge solutions. Countless rural Minnesota communities have shown the way. Your community can too!

We’ll be in touch again soon with more information:

  • We will share information on the regional meetings as details become available.
  • Conference registration coming in August!

Questions? Visit the conference webpage

Blandin, Northland, IRRRB helps Arrowhead leaders focus on broadband

Grand Rapids Herald Review reports

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, local leaders throughout Minnesota’s Arrowhead Region (Aitkin, Cook, Carlton, Itasca, Koochiching, Lake and St. Louis Counties) came together to assess their communities’ strengths and challenges in building and sustaining broadband-powered economies. Based on what they learned, eight projects emerged and will be supported through regional grants.

“Arrowhead Regional leaders had the courage and tenacity to dedicate time during a pandemic to look deeply at how broadband was propelling or, because of the lack of it, preventing community growth,” said Tuleah Palmer, president and CEO at Blandin Foundation. “These small grants will kindle the real power of this initiative – the collaborative, innovative spirit living within our rural communities.”

Here are some of the grants that were funded…

  • With an $8,000 grant, St. Louis County School District 2142 will map students’ homes within the St. Louis County School District (including Nett Lake, NorthWoods, Tower, Babbitt, Cherry and SouthRidge) to determine existing broadband speeds and plan for a wireless broadband network to encompass the 3,850 square miles of the district. Leading the project, Range Association of Municipalities and Schools (RAMS) is working in partnership with the Northeast Service Cooperative on a proposed wireless network build off their middle mile fiber network that runs throughout the service area. Ultimately, the project hopes to serve many of the district’s 2,200 students at the lowest possible cost.
  • Iron Range Tourism Bureau will develop a co-working space and expand their outreach and recruitment of remote workers. This project builds on their Hello Iron Range initiative, a talent attraction initiative that promotes the region’s workforce opportunities and connects incoming and existing residents to local networking events and resources.
  • Minnesota’s Children’s Press will create a new youth-, knowledge- and tech-driven genre of literature with help from a $35,000 grant. Through this project, youth will collect and map locations of litter in Grand Marais and on the shores of Lake Superior using ArcGIS Mapping software. Following data analysis, youth will write, illustrate, and publish a book about their findings and solutions. An outreach campaign will focus on both the findings of the project as well as the process and it will include presentations to local leaders, workshop offerings, a website housing free civic digital journalism resources and a social media series.
  • Smart North will plan for and implement a pilot project for smart streetlights and mobility hubs in the City of Grand Rapids through the support of a $50,000 grant. This infrastructure will allow city departments to access and share data, enable robust 5G connectivity throughout the city and provide municipal WiFi access. In partnership with The Grand Iron Range CAV Initiative, this effort will support the test of the country’s first autonomous shuttle vehicle in a rural, all-season community.
  • Northspan seeks to strengthen equitable digital access across the Arrowhead region through their Welcoming Community initiative with the support of a $50,000 grant. Through this project, Northspan will gather regional broadband data to create a baseline for fair, equal access to broadband and technology and explore how it impacts people of various race/ethnicities, income, education and ages within the Arrowhead region. This data will inform a series of conversations and engagements on why digital equity gaps exist and inform programming to address gaps.

EVENT June 23: Lunch Bunch – MN speed tests and mapping

Each month the Blandin Foundation hosts two conversation or lunch bunch sessions. The first Lunch Bunch in June happens next week on June 23 noon to 1pm. Here’s the topic:

Speed tests connect users, providers and policymakers.

Speed tests are tools that households can use to let broadband providers and policymakers know what they are experiencing. They are used to create maps that help providers decide who needs better broadband, help policymakers decide who needs attention and people decide where to relocate homes or businesses. But what do we do when different tests show different results? What do different tests consider? And what are contributing factors?

We have a few folks on the frontlines willing to come to talk to us about the tests and we want to hear from you. What are you experiencing? Do you have questions?

Pleased to have folks from Geo Partners (Glenn Fishbine and Paul Demming) and a few providers (Travis Carter from USI) and hopefully Steve Howard from Paul Bunyan (based on availability) join us for the conversation.

Register now!