Strut Your Stuff: Broadband projects in Koochiching County

Part of becoming a Blandin Broadband Community (BBC), is the opportunity to show off what you’ve been doing related to broadband in your community. It was great to hear from folks from Koochiching County.

Koochiching is well orgnaized and engaged. They talked abtout a number of projects. The ones that really caught my attention is broadband in the homeless shelter. WHat an asset to help people get jobs, education and healthcare. They also have virtual reality headsets to check out at the library especially for senior living centers and students. And they are busy getting tools for COVID-19-strength cleaning between users.

The shared a list of prjects and budgets:

Strut Your Stuff: Broadband projects in Swift County

Part of becoming a Blandin Broadband Community (BBC), is the opportunity to show off what you’ve been doing related to broadband in your community. It was great to hear from folks from Swift County.

They talk about how they have used broadband to set up camping reservations, a resource that will likely see more action after COVID-19 restrictions. They worked with PCs for People that they are able to distribute and they were able to access, which offsets the story of the families who try to do everything during the quarantine using one computer.

STEM camp was a big hit for kids last summer; they’re just waiting to hear if that will be an option this year. And they have been working with local businesses to help them make the best use of digital marketing.

Policy changes make telehealth possible especially for non-COVID19 issues

Faribault Daily News reports…

While the technology enabling the significant shift to telemedicine has been in place for years, most providers have preferred to stick with face-to-face appointments. In addition, Medicare and other health insurance often haven’t reimbursed care providers for virtual appointments.

On both counts, change has come rapidly. On March 30, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced that it would reimburse physicians for telehealth visits at the same rate as for in-person visits.

Effective March 1, the change covers checkups and medical care provided for any reason, not just coronavirus care. Medicare also expanded access by scrapping a rule that required all telehealth visits to take place on devices meeting federal online privacy and security standards.

U.S. Sens. Tina Smith and Amy Klobuchar feel that doesn’t go far enough. Together, Minnesota’s two senators introduced the Health Care at Home Act last Friday, with the backing of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the American Psychiatric Association and other organizations. The bill is designed to reduce the gap in coverage for telemedicine visits in comparison to in-person visits. It also prohibits restrictions as to which particular medical issues are eligible for telemedicine reimbursement.

Other restrictions existed at the state level, including limits on the number of reimbursable telemedicine visits per week and a requirement that telemedicine appointments be conducted over video chat rather than by phone.

Maisha Giles, the Minnesota Department of Health’s behavioral health director, said her agency has worked rapidly to help care providers across the state adapt to telemedicine. In addition, she said, the department has provided flexible grant funding for providers.

Strut Your Stuff: Broadband projects with the GRIZZLIES (Cook, Orr and Bois Forte)

Part of becoming a Blandin Broadband Community (BBC), is the opportunity to show off what you’ve been doing related to broadband in your community. It was great to hear from folks from the GRIZZLIES today. (Grizzlies is the mascot for North Woods School, which was opened in 2012 when the schools in Cook, Orr and Bois Forte were consolidated.)

It’s great to see how well the three communities work together. Really great.

And they provides a handy list of all of their projects:

  1. QuickBooks Online (Lisa Hyppa)
    The Grizzly’s continue to work with Lisa Hyppa to provide QuickBooks online education and program development to local business throughout our region. The intake of this program has given multiple local businesses the opportunity to manage their business online and educate themselves in basic accounting practices provided through Lisa.
  2. Cook Library WIFI Hotspots (Crystal Phillips)
    The Cook Library continues to Provide WIFI access points and computer access to Members of the Cook Library. During the Covid-19 crisis, the WIFI hotspots are in high demand. The success of this program has led to the procurement and disbursement of WIFI hotspots to all elementary students of the Nett Lake Elementary school in order to provide a means of communication between school children and teachers in areas where broadband is limited.
  3. Orr Center Wireless Buildout (Wendy Purdy)
    The Orr Center (Old Orr High School) was in need of new wireless equipment. Since the closing of the school, the original Cisco access points were in dire need of replacing. Local Tech guys Lou Pliml, and Evertt Huismann completed a wireless implementation of the school providing coverage to all areas of the building. Lou and Evertt donated a considerable amount of time chasing old cut out wiring and replacement of cabling to make this project a success.
  4. Wireless to Ball Fields Grizzly’s school (John Vukemanich, Lou Pliml, Evertt Huismann)
    The Grizzly’s school had a request to enhance its WIFI access to the ball fields surrounding the school. The school teachers and athletic programs utilize this WIFI to provide program access to the school children and athletic game broadcasting via you tube. This project got highly technical as it required fiber optic cabling to be installed within the school to the roof of the school. One directional Wireless bridge was installed on top of the school and the other on top of the Football field broadcasting house to make the wireless connection. An outdoor access point was then installed at the football broadcasting house connecting the teachers, students and media broadcasters to the school network. Local Tech guys Lou Pliml and Evertt Huismann installed and setup the equipment. Bois Forte Purchased and donated the fiber optic cabling and bridging equipment needed to provide the equipment between the school and Football field clubhouse.
  1. Art Unlimited- Website Design training
    Our original intention of this program was to develop a specific website tailored to all sports activities of the Grizzly’s school and have it built solely by Art Unlimited out of Cook. Throughout this website would be various content on games and activities with links for community members to watch local games being broadcasted via broadband through computer, iPads, iPhones etc.  Once we progressed, we revisited our intention and realized it was not in the best intention of the school nor the students. We then retailored the program such that Art Unlimited would train and teach various students on how to build and develop websites, gather information and how to manage sites properly. This project did not go unnoticed from the school district. In due diligence we notified the school district of our intention on providing school activity content via this newly created website and after a few short meetings they were ok with the project. This project has been indivertibly affected by the Covid-19 epidemic, but will still manage to go Live in June prior to the start of the upcoming years athletic programs.
  1. Zup’s Online Ordering Process
    Due to Covid-19, various community members reached out to us for assistance on how best to provide social distancing when forced to enter small community-based grocery stores. We decided that a web-based ordering system for food from the local Zup’s IGA would best satisfy the community’s needs and provide the protection necessary to safeguard a lot of the elderly and at-risk community members within our area. The website has been up and running and handling several requests per day. We are anticipating early June for completion as each item throughout the store must be accounted for and maintained throughout the website in a specific database. Local Web Designer Art Unlimited and Local tech guy Lou Pliml were influential on integration and implementation of this project. Zup’s IGA expressed their appreciation recently on the project and how it has aided their business throughout this epidemic.
  1. Nett Lake Fiber to the Home Project
    Due to the implementation of various broadband activities and projects throughout our region provided through the Blandin Foundation, the Bois Forte Reservation was successful in applying for DEED Fiber to the home funding to build out a complete fiber optic to the premise buildout. Other contributing sources of funding came through the IRRRB and Shakopee Reservation. No funding through the Blandin Foundation was used to acquire this grant funding, but was considered one of the primary sources of community-based involvement needed to prove that such a buildout is necessary and financially stable to implement within this region. Bois Forte is now researching funding opportunities to provide engineering costs and estimates to the communities that have close ties to the reservation. These community include the City of Orr, Cook, Tower, Soudan and the Greenwood Township area.

MN Nonprofits boost mental health services – great news for those with broadband

Minneapolis Star Tribune reports…

Minnesota nonprofits are boosting mental health services, bracing for a wave created by the COVID-19 pandemic.

This is the “calm before the storm,” said Shannah Mulvihill, executive director of Mental Health Minnesota, a St. Paul nonprofit. “We’re concerned there’s going to be a flood of people in need of help. We will continue to see an increase in anxiety, depression and PTSD-like symptoms for a long time going forward.”

Rising unemployment and social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic is exacerbating anxiety, depression, eating disorders and other mental health issues. According to the Washington Post, a federal emergency hotline for people in emotional distress registered a more than 1,000% increase in April compared with last year. And, in a Kaiser Family Foundation poll, nearly half of Americans reported the coronavirus outbreak was harming their mental health.

The article outlines some resources and trends and continues…

In fact, therapy and other mental health services are easier to access with providers shifting to telehealth, said Sue Abderholden, executive director of NAMI Minnesota.

What they neglect to point is that only people with broadband can access these resources. They do list a few phone numbers but that’s not the same as a face to face session or for those who need it a text-based conversation. As many of us are quarantined with loves ones at our side all-day, every-day alternate resources that are quieter may be welcome to protect privacy and safety.

Dakota Language gets new life with Zoom

MN Public Radio reports…

These days, Dakota — the native language of the Prairie Island Indian Community — isn’t widely spoken.

But the tribe is trying to change that and the pandemic has offered them an unusual opportunity to do so: by bringing language classes online, they’ve been able to reach more members than ever before.

In person classes have typically attracted a handful of people, said tribe communications manager Rayanna Lennes.

Using technology like Zoom to teach live classes, and archiving them online, gives far-flung tribal members an opportunity to reconnect with their language — and each other.

I love this. The loss of a language is huge loss to the culture and to see how technology is bringing it back is amazing.

Strut Your Stuff: Broadband projects in Aitkin

Part of becoming a Blandin Broadband Community (BBC), is the opportunity to show off what you’ve been doing related to broadband in your community. It was great to hear from folks in Aitkin today.

Like all of the latest BBCs, COVID played a big role in both preparing the community for the pandemic quarantine and stopped projects in their tracks. In Aitkin we heard a lot about healthcare. Turns out they were able to serve 900 patients online in the first few weeks of the quarantine because they were prepared – but also because policy, especially around reimbursement made it financially possible. In fact, the health care folks were somehow able to expedite a plan scheduled really through the end of the year to deploy measures in weeks. Wow!

There were also some projects like the fancy new super-efficient conference room at the Birch Street Center where at first were put on hold as communities meetings were cancelled but now it back in play as they are planning to use it to stream Tai Chi classes for local seniors.

Aitkin is still working on getting broadband and it was good to hear about their short term plans to get it to people immediately but also long term goals to make sure they got what they needed.