Medical Licensure Compacts makes Telehealth easier in Minnesota

MHealth Intelligence reports on policies that will smooth the path to more telehealth usage…

More than 3,000 US physicians have received permission to practice in multiple states through the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, giving them the opportunity to expand their practice through telehealth and telemedicine.

According to the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Commission, a branch of the Federation of State Medical Boards, 3,426 medical licenses have been by medical boards in member states since the launch of the Compact in April 2017. The IMLCC, meanwhile, has processed 1,867 applications and 497 licenses have been renewed through the compact.

Minnesota part of the compact…

Launched as a means of expediting the licensure process for physicians looking to practice in more than one state, the compact has been approved in the District of Colombia, Guam and 24 states: Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

New Toolkit to Answer Your Library’s Tech Questions

There’s a new toolkit to help rural and tribal librarians work with technology. It includes things like:

  • Technology Inventory
  • Types of broadband services and activities they support
  • Technical staff and support required
  • Broadband funding (E-rate and more)
  • Best practices – including training, acceptable use policies and filtering
  • Technology planning templates

Some parts are pretty library-specific but many could spur conversations with other community institutions or communities in general. You can learn more from this handy video…

Blockchain voting tested with West Virginians abroad

I thought this was fascinating. The Washington Post reports…

Nearly 140 West Virginians living abroad in 29 countries have cast their election ballots in an unprecedented pilot project that involves voting remotely by mobile device, according to state officials.

Here’s how it works…

The Voatz app has been used on a limited basis in a number of other settings, such as student council races and West Virginia’s May primary. But Election Day represents the company’s biggest test yet.

To cast a ballot, voters must first register through the app by uploading an image of their driver’s license or other photo identification. Then the app instructs them to submit a short video of their own face. Facial recognition technology supplied by a voter’s iPhone or Android device matches the video against the photo ID, and the personal information on the ID is matched to West Virginia’s voter registration database. Once the verification is complete, voters can make their selections and confirm their ballot by fingerprint or facial recognition.

Hilary Braseth, Voatz’s director of product design, said that in addition to using technology for verification, the company also has human workers manually reviewing the submitted information. The company does not store the personal data once a voter’s identity has been confirmed, she said.

Votes are stored on a private blockchain — essentially a database where records are secured using complex computational algorithms — and unlocked by county clerks when the polls close.

“When they take the votes from the blockchain, it will immediately print onto a paper ballot — just like the same look and feel of what voters are physically voting with on Election Day,” Braseth said. “And then those paper ballots will be fed into the tabulating machines on the ground at the state level.”

Overseas voters who used Voatz will receive an anonymized copy of the ballot that they submitted remotely; another copy will be made available to Warner’s office for auditing purposes.

Robocop drones making arrests in California

This isn’t from Minnesota, but I thought it was so interesting. GovTech reports on how the police are using drones in Chula Vista…

The Chula Vista Police Department this week began using drones to respond to 911 calls.

Since Monday, drones responded to 30 emergency calls and led to three arrests, including one for felony domestic violence.

In the domestic violence case, the drone hovered above a red tent in a canyon where a homeless man suspected of stabbing a woman with a knife was hiding out. The drone broadcast live footage to police officers’ cell phones who maneuvered over brush and difficult terrain to get to the tent.

The drone’s camera captured the suspect exiting the tent without a knife and police officers made an arrest without incident.

Olivia MN Is looking to use broadband to make civic, social and economic connections

I recently read (in the Daily Yonder) that 20 percent of US newspapers have closed in the last 14 years. And almost a third of those papers were rural papers. The article details the results…

“Half of the 3,143 counties in the country now have only one newspaper, usually a small weekly, attempting to cover its various communities,” the report says. “Almost 200 counties in the country have no newspaper at all. The people with the least access to local news are often the most vulnerable – the poorest, least educated and most isolated.”

The study says that counties with no local news publication face special civic challenges as a result. But an official with one small town that lost its paper 10 years ago said they’ve made do, with the government itself playing are larger role in communication.

Funny enough I was then invited to a meeting in Olivia, Minnesota to join my friend and colleague Jane Leonard at Growth and Justice to talk to community leaders about encouraging civic connection and online tools, such as the newspaper. G&J is working on a plan for the future through a process called Thriving by Design. It’s a grassroots, holistic look at what Minnesota needs to do to thrive. They hosted a conference with wide representation last summer to discussion topics that are important to Minnesotans and are continuing to work with that group to create a policy blueprint to bring in the next Governor.

It was at the meeting last summer that Jane made a connection to the folks in Olivia (and her Grandma was born there!).

Olivia is looking for opportunity. The connectivity around Olivia is uneven – as it is in so many communities. People closer to town are pretty well connected; between towns that’s less true. BUT access wasn’t really the topic of the day. What they really wanted to know was what they could do with connectivity to help bring the community closer together, and to continue to be thriving. To get folks to communicate, cooperate, collaborate.

We ended up broadening the topic – we discussed potential state and national models for becoming a rural innovation hub, with broadband-based development strategies. To be clear, Olivia has NOT lost a paper but the paper there is smart enough to see the opportunity to become much more! There’s a chance to use technology to encourage and support a business and social enterprise-minded community with an economy that works with and for all, leveraging the Main Street program and other civic infrastructures for modern community and economic development.

It was a great discussion. It started with the recognition that for rural areas, the age of broadband can be damning or lifesaving. There is an opportunity for those to take it. Broadband should eliminate the barrier of distance and it does for those who have it, who know how to use it, and are looking to innovate.

ISSA Team of Bemidji Wins 2018 GigaZone Gaming Championship

I love this event!

Over 3,500 attended the 3rd annual GigaZone Gaming Championship on Saturday, October 20 at the Sanford Center George W. Neilson Convention Center. The event featured free gaming on various console and arcade games, numerous tournaments, virtual reality, door prizes, and more.

This one of a kind regional gaming event showcases Paul Bunyan Communications’ IT and web development team which custom built and integrated much of the online technology and leverages the speed of the GigaZone one of the largest rural all-fiber optic Gigabit networks in the country. The entire event was run off a single residential GigaZone Internet connection.

ISSA Team from Bemidji won the 3rd annual GigaZone Gaming Championship and $1,500 defeating the Iron Range Legends who won $900 for second place.  The Shinob Squad took third place and $450.  A total of 32 of northern Minnesota’s best Overwatch teams competed on the esports stadium style stage in the GigaZone Championship Arena.

In addition to the Overwatch Community 3v3 Tournament, there was several other open tournaments including Fortnite, Rocket League, Mario Kart 8, Madden 19, Super Smash Bros. (4), Super Smash Bros. Melee, Magic the Gathering Booster Drafts, Tron, Bust A Move, Galaga, and Asteroids.  Admission was free and there were a lot of door prizes given away including grand prize winners Michael Railsback of Bemidji who won an Xbox One X and Jesse Waldo of Detroit Lakes who won a PS4 Pro.

“There is a large gaming community in our area and GigaZone Gaming Championship not only showcases some of the region’s best gamers but it gives everyone a chance to get in on the action!  It was awesome to see so many people from right here and all over come together!” said Gary Johnson, Paul Bunyan Communications CEO/General Manager

“Our cooperative continues to expand one of the largest rural fiber gigabit networks in the country and that brings many advantages to our members.  The GigaZone provides extreme speed and low latency which are critical for the best online gaming experience and the GigaZone Gaming Championship showcases just that,” added Leo Anderson, Paul Bunyan Communications Digital Services Supervisor.

“There is no other gaming event like it anywhere I’ve seen. It’s unique to our area and we are very proud of our team for making it happen. We’re already looking forward to next year.” added Brian Bissonette, Paul Bunyan Communications Marketing Supervisor.

This Paul Bunyan Communications event includes the talents of many local partners including NLFX, Accidently Cool Games, Northern Amusement, the Sanford Center as well support from several regional and national partners.

For more information on the GigaZone Gaming Championship visit www.gigazonegaming.com

Paul Bunyan Communications has the region’s largest and fastest all fiber optic network with over 5,100 square miles throughout most of Beltrami County and portions of Cass, Hubbard, Itasca, Koochiching, and St. Louis Counties. The Cooperative provides Broadband High Speed Internet Services including the GigaZone, digital and high definition television services, digital voice services, Residential and Business IT services, and is also northern Minnesota’s certified Apple Service Center.

Broadband down from Wed to Fri in St Paul MN – no TV, no Internet

Last week, my internet was down starting about 5:30 Wednesday afternoon until Friday noon. At first I thought I’ll give it a minute and just use my hotspot. I left, returned home and forgot about it until I realized the Internet was painfully slow. Couldn’t download email and look at a website at the same time slow. Then I remembered I was using the hotspot.

So first – anyone who thinks a family can thrive on a hotspot connection. Think again. My kids were on their smartphones using up our cell plan, not on the hotspot network. It was just me. I wasn’t uploading video. I was doing the tasks that most folks claim you can do with slow access – checking email and browsing the web albeit at the same time .So call another number. At 8:29 I reach the “Internet Repair” online chat on my phone.

At 8:43 they transfer me to the people who deal with account that bundle Internet and TV. At 9:10 they told me a technician would have to be dispatched to my house and they could be here on Friday between 11 and 3.

The person on the phone was nice enough. The technician who arrived before noon was nice enough. It took him 10 minutes to realize that the problem was leading into the house – not in the house. In other words, nothing I had done.

But in those days, kids had a hard time getting homework done. I had to leave to do work, my online volunteer work took longer and I had to wait until Friday to queue up my radio show. If I lived like this all of the time I would do less volunteer work and not be a radio host and kids’ grades could suffer. Doors close when you can’t get adequate access.

And the TV was gone. And while some might suggest my kids could play outside, they are teenagers. On a rainy afternoon I’d much rather have them cozied up on my couch than walking the neighborhood! People who roll their eyes at using broadband for Netflix have never had to entertain kids – from 2 to 20. It serves a purpose.

I think we need to recognize that broadband is a utility both in terms of transport but on a practical matter. Very hard to live without it. And providers need to be ready for demand and reliability. The connection wasn’t down because of a natural disaster – it just went down. And I have a choice of provider – but who wants to change provider regularly. I won’t say who mine is – but I will give a nod to Comcast; they called me to see if they could help because, well I tweet stuff. I tweeted I was down, again didn’t mention a provider, and they took the initiative to see if they could help. Sadly they aren’t my provider right now.

My week renews my passion to advocate for broadband to everyone! And I hope my story – encourages others to advocate. As a community, state or country, we can all be more productive with better broadband.