Telehealth in MN – how to find it, what insurance pays for, how to get it

The UpTake has a useful article on the how-tos and some of the whys of telehealth policy during/because of COVID. It might be helpful to folks you know (or you) but also I think it’s helpful as a policymaker or community leader to think about telehealth from the perspective of the patient or provider.

How does insurance coverage for telehealth work in Minnesota since the pandemic…

Minnesota has been following the federal recommendations for COVID-19 emergency telehealth coverage since March 2020, including requiring that insurers cover telehealth sessions at the same rate as in-person appointments. At the time this article is written, clients’ homes are still considered an appropriate originating site for telehealth appointments.

This means that your insurance company should continue to cover your telehealth sessions at this time, and you would have the same out-of-pocket expense as if you had come to the office in person. It also means that your insurance will not require you to travel to an approved originating site.

Currently, Minnesota’s emergency telehealth coverage is tied to the federal state of emergency. Coverage is ongoing, as the pandemic is ongoing. States that have made changes to these policies have given a minimum of 30 days notice, and providers have a responsibility to be attentive to these regulations. As changes occur, providers will give their clients as much notice as possible about how this might impact their treatment and options for services.

How does it work for telehealth work for providers…

The state of Minnesota requires that clinicians submit a statement indicating that they are qualified to provide telehealth services. This is something that clients do not need to do, and the therapist has the responsibility to take this step prior to providing telehealth services.

What if my provider is not in MN…

Since before the pandemic began, licensure requirements for mental health professionals have been based on the client’s physical location at the time of service. This means, as a therapist, I must be licensed where my client is when they check in for a telehealth session.

Previously, Minnesota had allowed out-of-state providers to offer telehealth services to Minnesota residents due to the COVID-19 state of emergency. This has been important for those living near boarders who had received in-person services in another state but now needed to be seen from home for safety reasons. However, this reciprocity is no longer in effect.

This means that providers in South Dakota, North Dakota, Iowa, and Wisconsin now need their clients to either come in person to the office or use an approved originating site across the border based on that state’s guidelines.

How can I get the services I need…

If you are uninsured, Walk-In Counseling Center continues to offer telehealth services in Minnesota, and Open Path Collective offers a national therapist directory to help individuals find low-cost therapy services.

If you have insurance, you can reach out to your insurance company to see which Minnesota providers are paneled with your plan. You can ask questions about which services are covered and whether you have to meet a deductible or will have a copay for each visit.

Essentia Health in Duluth gets nearly $1 million from FCC for telehealth

The FCC reports

The Federal Communications Commission today approved an initial set of 62 applications for funding commitments totaling $41.98 million for Round 2 of its COVID-19 Telehealth Program.  Health care providers in each state, territory, and the District of Columbia, including those previously unfunded in Round 1, will use this funding to provide telehealth services during the coronavirus pandemic.  The FCC’s COVID-19 Telehealth Program supports the efforts of health care providers to continue serving their patients by providing reimbursement for telecommunications services, information services, and connected devices necessary to enable telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, access to health care has proven to be not only a national issue, but also a local issue, and it is imperative that every community is given the tools to access this care as safely and effectively as possible.  The FCC is committed to ensuring that every state and territory in the United States receive funding as part of this program,” said FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel.  “The FCC took action earlier this year to establish a system for rating applications in Round 2, factoring in the hardest hit and lowest-income areas, Tribal communities, and previously unfunded states and territories.  Now even more doctors and nurses in every corner of our country can establish or expand telehealth services to support patients and their families.”

This first set of awards will go to applications that qualify for the equitable distribution step, as required by Congress and outlined in the FCC’s rules, to ensure nationwide distribution of funding to health care providers in each state, territory, and the District of Columbia.  This step funds the highest-scoring applications in every state, territory, and the District of Columbia plus the second highest-scoring application from the states and territories that did not receive funding in Round 1, if multiple applications were submitted from those areas.

Round 2 is a $249.95 million federal initiative that builds on the $200 million program established as part of the CARES Act.  Now that funding has been committed to the highest-scoring applications from each state, territory, and the District of Columbia, the next funding awards will commit funding to the highest-scoring applications, regardless of geography, until at least $150 million has been committed.  The FCC’s Wireline Competition Bureau will then announce an opportunity for all remaining applicants to supplement their applications, as required by Congress.  After all remaining applicants have the opportunity to supplement, the remaining program funding will be committed.

Here’s the Minnesota recipient…

Essentia Health in Duluth, an integrated health system in Minnesota, serving patients in the upper Midwest, was awarded $981,204 to support the acquisition of remote monitoring devices and video carts with peripheral cameras and stethoscopes/EKGs for care during the pandemic, and to increase wireless broadband coverage at eight clinics to allow for additional space for telehealth patients.

Making the case for ongoing telehealth: the flu is contagious

Minneapolis Star Tribune reports…

Visiting a doctor’s office after a patient with flu-like illness appears to be a risk for getting sick, according to University of Minnesota research that could have implications for infection control and the use of online visits for primary care.

Researchers from the U, Harvard University and athenahealth, reviewed electronic medical records for 6,709 U.S. primary care clinics in 2016 and 2017 and found that people who visited their clinics the same day after patients with flu-like illnesses were more likely to return within two weeks with their own respiratory ailments.

The risk is only slight, as the rate of post-visit illnesses was 2.9 per 1,000 in people who visited clinics the same day after flu patients, compared with 2.2 per 1,000 in patients who visited clinics before flu patients. However, lead author Hannah Neprash said the nearly 32% difference in the rates was significant and provided some of the first documented evidence that clinics can be infection sources for patients — not just hospitals.

Seems like a good reason to promote continued telehealth, especially with folks with flu-like (or pandemic symptoms)…

Doctor visits in the study occurred well before the declaration in early 2020 of the COVID-19 pandemic, but Neprash said lessons learned in the pandemic could likely address the causes of infections in clinics. Mask-wearing in clinics could be one solution along with the continued use of telehealth services for basic primary care when appropriate.

“Maybe some of it should stick around even after we emerge from the pandemic,” Neprash said.

Mayo’s video visits up 5000 percent but how does that impact Rochester’s local economy?

The Post Bulletin reports

“We’re currently touching, caring for more patients on a given day now than they were pre-pandemic when you add in telemedicine activities, plus the patients coming on site for care here,” said Dr. Steve Ommen, a cardiologist and the medical director for experience products for Mayo Clinic’s Center for Digital Health.

Video visits skyrocketed more than 5,000% from 278 visits in February 2020 to 16,532 in December at Mayo Clinic-Rochester. Phone telemedicine visits also soared from 169 to 7,590 in the same timeframe, peaking at 24,670 visits in April 2020.

A looming question remains: How will this affect Rochester’s economy when much of the downtown and the largest private-public economic partnership in state history has been built with the presumption that many of Mayo’s patients will be visiting the city in person?

Sounds like the local economic developers aren’t too worried…

Holly Masek, executive director of the Rochester Downtown Alliance, said her team hasn’t specifically studied how telehealth use could affect the downtown. The general consensus is that there are enough patients traveling to Rochester for extended stays and more specialized care that businesses will not see a significant decrease in income because of telemedicine use.

There are pluses and minuses with remote working too…

Fewer Mayo Clinic employees are working downtown than before the pandemic, though telemedicine certainly can’t be pinpointed as the sole cause of this shift.

“Approximately 2,900 staff who were previously based in downtown Rochester will now work off campus a majority of the time,” Mayo Clinic spokeswoman Ginger Plumbo said to the Post Bulletin’s Jeff Kiger in early July. “This number evolved as Mayo Clinic continued to assess the workforce beyond the initial group of non-clinical administrative staff.”

The number went up from the 1,500 figure Mayo Clinic reported in October 2020.

It looks like the Mayo, more than the city, will need to look at the impact…

Preliminary studies from other healthcare institutions across the country provide a picture into how telemedicine use affects revenue. An April 2021 study by the Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania found that the adoption of telemedicine services resulted in just a -.8% hit to the department’s revenue.

“Given that the nation’s health systems are operating on thin margins amid rising payment and cost pressures, the findings of our study underscore the need for thoughtful examination to ensure telemedicine is used and supported effectively and sustainably,” read the study.

Legislative changes makes it easier to offer and afford telehealth…

Legislation passed in June 2021 as part of the Health and Human Services bill made these changes part of law, not just part of the emergency powers declaration.

For Mayo Clinic campuses in Arizona and Florida, the number of patients receiving care via telemedicine may differ. Arizona recently passed similar protections to Minnesota, while Florida rolled back telehealth regulations passed during the pandemic.

Even if Mayo Clinic’s bottom line isn’t greatly affected by telemedicine use, the patient’s pocketbook may be.

A 2014 study found that the average estimated cost of a telehealth visit is $40 to $50 compared to average cost of $136 to $175 for in-person acute care.

Minnesota legislation regulates the cost of telemedicine services to not surpass what the in-person cost would be.

Can broadband help with these wild fires? Turns out yes!

I am in St Paul and I can tell you the air is thick and air quality seems poor. My colleagues up North say it’s worse there (between storms!). So this story from Urgent Communications seems particularly apt today…

Members of the Verizon Response Team (VRT) are using a variety of solutions to deliver broadband communications to public-safety agencies battling wildfires throughout the U.S.—at no additional cost—as part of the carrier’s Verizon Frontline offering, according to a Verizon official.

Cory Davis, director of Verizon Response and public-safety operations, said the VRT has been “super busy,” responding to a total of 74 named wildfires already in what is proving to be a very active wildfire season.

“We’ve had 88 deployments across the United States, from California, Oregon, Arizona, Montana, all the way to Minnesota,” Davis said during an interview with IWCE’s Urgent Communications. “There’s a huge fire—the Delta Lake fire—that’s burning right now along the Canadian border. We sent a team up there to help support the operations center, working really closely with the COMLs up there.”

Apparently some states are used to this, Minnesota is listed as a newer or less frequent fire place…

“This is the first time my East team went to a large forest fire in that part of the country,” Davis said. “Places like Canada and Minnesota just generally don’t have large forest fires that often like the West does. But as things are getting warmer and the climate is changing, we’re seeing that fires are popping up everywhere—I had my team out in North Carolina at a fire about a month ago.

The goal is bringing the network closer to the emergency workers…

Firefighters often work to control and extinguish wildfires in locations where terrestrial wireless coverage is not available, so many of the VRT solutions utilize geosynchronous (GEO) satellite communications with “public-safety-grade priority” to provide backhaul, according to Davis.

“We can get an average of 30 mbps downlink and 10 mbps uplink,” he said. “Obviously, there will be bursts with more [data throughput] being available.

“The biggest thing is dealing with latency when you use satellite backhaul—anywhere between 600 and 800 milliseconds—but first responders can do a lot with 30 mbps.”

Davis said that Verizon is closely monitoring developments in the low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellite arena and will consider leveraging that technology in the future. This assessment process include testing of LEO-based offerings from companies like Lynk and AST SpaceMobile, which have announced satellite LTE services that will connect directly to a smartphone, as opposed to requiring the user to deploy a satellite dish or a specialized device, he said.

In addition to traditional deployable communications solutions—from those on vehicles to offerings housed in Pelican cases that can be carried by hand to a location—VRTs are using satellite pico cells on trailers (SPOTs) to deliver broadband in a focused area to help support first-responder communications.

“Essentially, we can provide not only a 4G LTE bubble but also a Wi-Fi bubble for—and it depends on the environment—about 6,000 to 7,000 square feet. So, it’s really good for base camps,” Davis said.

“Since it is enclosed, we also have the capability to have it be like a mini operational command-center—you can fit two or three good-sized adults in there. So, you can turn it into not only an asset that deploys coverage and capacity, but it can also work as kind of a makeshift operations center for a very, very small group.”

Verizon cannot use the high-power user equipment (HPUE) that is only permitted on the 700 MHz Band 14 spectrum licensed for FirstNet, but VRTs do have some solutions that can be deployed when extra range is needed, Davis said.

Telemedicine gains momentum during pandemic and policy changes will keep it going

The Pine Journal reports…

Behavioral and mental health treatment was ahead of other specialties in terms of telemedicine use before the pandemic, but patients have still increasingly turned to those services over the past year.

One study found that telemedical care for mental health or substance abuse disorders increased from 1% of visits before the pandemic to 41% in October 2020.

For most people providing and receiving medical care, the escalated adoption of telemedicine is one of the silver linings amid the devastation of the pandemic. The funds funneled into the technology reflect its increased use. Investment in telehealth technologies in the first half of 2021 was greater than all of 2020, according to an analysis from management consulting firm McKinsey & Company.

While the benefits of telemedicine have been especially appreciated among people who live with physical disability or mental illness, telehealth has also created new barriers for users during a time when medical support was vital.

Telehealth was an important tool…

A NAMI survey found that telehealth visits provided connection in a time when people were starved for it, especially while grappling with mental illness.

“Great to be able to connect with services right from my home. Being able to continue to be in visual connection with my therapist during the most isolated days/weeks of this pandemic was crucial. Nice to see people without masks on!” one respondent wrote.

Several respondents stated that they appreciated the relief of not having to figure out transportation for in-person appointments. Others wrote that they thought it was the safest option for themselves and their families during the pandemic, and it allowed them to stay in a comfortable environment on days they weren’t feeling well.

Unfortunately access to technology was a barrier to some…

“The elderly and kids are the ones who probably lost the most ground in terms of the pandemic and having to move to telehealth,” Abderholden said.

survey conducted by the Minnesota Department of Health also found that these were the groups most affected by barriers with technology.

Although many communities found some solutions…

The SEMCIL [Southeastern Minnesota Center for Independent Living] team offered a repository of 20 iPads and 50 Chromebooks to those in need during the pandemic, fueled largely by CARES Act dollars.

But access wasn’t the only issue…

Older patients seeking treatment for mental illness often encountered technological issues, sometimes only accessing their telehealth services after a provider walked them through how to download the software. Some users stuck with audio-only services, a lifeline for those living in areas with poor internet access.

Even for technology savants, telehealth posed a different problem: screen-time burnout.

School-age children who spent all day in front of their computers engaging in remote schooling would often not feel like diving into emotional issues in the same setting.

“The technology worked fine, but my child was burnt out on doing everything via video and started ending the sessions early. I’m not sure how to make the engagement better though,” wrote one respondent to the NAMI survey.

There were also privacy concerns for people who shared spaces with family members and couldn’t find a discreet area to candidly express their struggles with a mental health professional. Bastin found herself moderating what she said and when, even as she logged into her therapy sessions in the privacy of her room, because she worried family members might hear through the walls.

Regulations have been changed to make telemedicine easier now and in the future…

For years, advocates have tried to loosen restrictions surrounding telemedicine access. When the pandemic prompted widespread use of telehealth services, legislative changes finally followed.

The location where patients are eligible to receive telehealth services broadened in spring 2020 under emergency power authorization, enabling in-home care, and not solely in-hospital or clinic care. A second change allowed for audio-only care, a shift from previous regulations that restricted telehealth visits to video.

Legislation passed in June 2021 as part of the Health and Human Services bill made these changes part of law, not just part of the emergency powers declaration. The coverage of audio-only services is still in question due to concerns regarding quality of care, Renner said, but it is protected for at least the next two years.

Mayo Clinic’s new mobile health bus for medical services and broadband access

KAALTV reports

As a way to improve health care access for those in rural communities across southern Minnesota, Mayo Clinic Health System unveiled its new mobile health clinic.

The mobile clinic includes two exam rooms and an onsite laboratory bringing health care directly to patients, for in-person care or virtual care via the onsite telehealth equipment.

Along with the wide range of medical services, they telehealth bus will also provide broadband access to those who need it…

The mobile health clinic will travel to communities across southern Minnesota. The mobile health clinic will also be offering high-speed internet connections so that patients can come and access their patient online service account, do express care online, and even conduct their own video visits with their provider or other providers within the Mayo Health System. Mayo says it will add stops to the mobile clinic when they identify the needs in rural communities.

Quarantine rules help spread telehealth options for rural moms-to-be in Bemidji

The Bemidji Pioneer reports

If there’s a silver lining to the COVID-19 pandemic, it may be how it sped up a change in prenatal care that could improve outcomes for rural mothers and babies.

Dr. Johnna Nynas, an OB/GYN physician at Sanford Health in Bemidji, discussed her hospital’s move to offering virtual visits during the past year.

“We started laying the groundwork a couple of years ago,” said Nynas. “We looked at implementing a virtual visit option that provided patients with some equipment to monitor their pregnancies at home, including a blood pressure cuff, and then a Doppler, so they can listen to their baby at home. But what really thrust us to the forefront and accelerated the timeline was the COVID pandemic.”

Technical and legal challenges involved the interface between patients at home and their medical records. But with the onset of the pandemic, Nynas said, “there were rapid changes in Congress that made it much easier for health care organizations to initiate telehealth.”

They need better broadband…

There are still barriers that need to be addressed, such as broadband and cellular access in rural areas and for lower-income families. And there are days when the technology doesn’t work as well as others, and doctors have to make do with voice-only telephone visits.

Still, Nynas said, virtual visits will likely continue even after COVID-19 fades from public awareness.

There is a need…

The disparity is real. Nynas quoted shocking statistics: 23 percent of American women live in rural areas, but only 6% of OB/GYNs practice in rural areas. “That’s the challenge that we’re up against,” she said.

The benefit of prenatal care is also real, even for women whose pregnancies are considered low-risk. “It’s better to connect with prenatal care and get that care when and however you can,” said Nynas, “because getting no prenatal care is definitely correlated with worse outcomes.”

At the same time, the costs of running a labor and delivery unit while performing fewer deliveries are widening the gap between rural patients and the care they need. “That’s where being able to offer services remotely can be a really helpful thing,” she said.

EVENT Jun 15: Rural Broadband & Telehealth Financing

Looks like an interesting session…

Rural Broadband & Telehealth Financing
Tuesday, June 15 at 2:00 PM Eastern —
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused many disruptions in our daily lives and highlighted disparities among communities. Schools have gone remote, healthcare providers have increased seeing patients virtually, and small businesses have shut their doors to in-store customers. These disruptions have particularly impacted rural communities where there is already a gap in accessing high-speed internet.

Join us for the CDFA // BNY Mellon Development Finance Webcast Series on Tuesday, June 15 at 2:00 PM Eastern to hear experts explain how rural communities can embrace the challenges of financing high-speed internet for the economic and societal gains provided by broadband.

Speakers:

  • James Young, Vice President, The Bank of New York Mellon, Moderator
  • Caitlin Cain, Vice President and Rural Director, Local Initiatives Support Corporation
  • Lindsay Miller, Of Counsel Attorney, Ice Miller LLP
  • Kenneth Neighbors, Partner, McGuireWoods LLP

To participate, register below. You will receive the login information on the day of the webcast. Registration is free and open to all interested parties.

Get Engaged! Contact Allison Rowland.

More white patients get COVID tested via telehealth; more black patients tested in ER

The UK Daily Mail reports…

White patients were more likely to be screened for Covid-19 during telehealth visits during the pandemic than their peers of other races, a new study suggests.

A research team led by members of the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute analyzed health record data at Hennepin Healthcare, a safety net hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to gauge when people were tested for COVID-19 based on a variety of demographic factors.

Researchers found that white patients were significantly more likely to receive a Covid-19 test than all other racial groups when they performed a doctors visit via telehealth, accounting for 64.5 percent of all tests.

Black patients received only nine percent of Covid-19 screenings performed by telehealth, while accounting for 45 percent of tests performed in an emergency department.

Black and white patients were around evenly likely to receive a Covid-19 screening in an in-patient setting, at 35.7 percent and 37.6 percent respectfully.

Researchers noted that patients who were receiving their tests in an emergency room or in-patient setting were more likely to need more intensive treatment, as their case of the virus was caught later than those who were screened via telehealth.

Non-English speakers were also tested less online (and off)…

Patients who speak English received a majority of the screenings no matter the setting, including a whopping 88 percent of screenings  performed via telehealth, and nearly 70 percent of tests overall.

They give some reasons…

Not all Americans have access to the stable internet connection necessary to access telehealth.

There is also a problem with insurers not knowing how to bill the visits properly, though many states, like Illinois, have passed laws regulating telehealth visits as normal doctor visits in terms of insurance and billing, preventing patients from being denied these visits by their insurance.

Researchers may have found another potential disparity in this study, though, as more research goes into the system that may be the future of medical care.

Health equity in Covid-19 testing was a problem early on in the pandemic as well, with the CDC reporting that ethnic minorities often faced barriers such as discrimination, transportation, lack of health care and more to not receiving same access as their white counterparts.

Many underserved, primarily minority, communities also were left without the needed supply of tests early on in the pandemic.

A Guide to help libraries build telehealth centers

Something for my librarian friends, a guide helps libraries build telehealth centers – Shhhhhh! The Doctor’s In. Guide to Connecting Library Patrons to Better Health

This guide lays out how to a) get to the heart of patrons’ healthcare needs, b) create something that’s never been done in your community before, and c) market your telehealth and broadband grant proposal. More than video chats, telehealth uses intranets and Internet networks to observe, diagnose, initiate or otherwise medically intervene, administer, monitor, record, and/or report on the continuum of care people receive when ill, injured, or wanting to stay well. I’ll take this definition one step further and differentiate between 1) real-time telehealth, 2) store-and-forward telehealth, and 3) “passive” telehealth.

A little more info…

This guide lays out a straightforward needs assessment process so you get a representative portrait of how telehealth can benefit the community. Libraries reach out and touch virtually everyone in their communities across the entire economic spectrum, so it’s quite exciting to imagine telehealth capabilities at work. Healthcare professionals weigh in on how to get the maximum impact from telehealth technology in your library. The guide also gives you tips and pointers on getting the best from your IT investment. Not only does it address access to broadband but also broadband and telehealth adoption and training. Ultimately, it takes funding to transform community dreams into reality. The guide offers insights into federal grant programs that fund libraries and telehealth: the FCC’s E-rate program, the Institute for Museums and Library Services (IMLS), and Health & Human Services (HHS), plus links to other valuable resources that help you.

2020 increases need for mental health services; telehealth helps meet the need

InForum reports that the events of 2020 have increased the need for great mental health services…

Common reasons people have sought therapy recently have been anxiety; depression; stress about the pandemic, parenting or job stability; loneliness; or increased substance use. Clabaugh said many clients are also grieving, whether it be the loss of friends or family to the pandemic or the loss of a job or stability in life. People also have been stressed about political events like the 2020 presidential election, or worry about various conspiracy theories online regarding politics and the pandemic.

To meet the increased demand, counseling centers have hired more clinicians in the last year, and some continue to add more therapists to take on new patients. Erickson said the appointment openings for new clinicians will fill within a week or two, and then will have a three- to four-week waiting list like the rest of the clinicians. Clabaugh said when she opened Insight Counseling almost four years ago, she planned to have two or three therapists, but now she has 20 because the demand has always been so high.

Telehealth has helped counselors reach more people…

At Arrowhead Psychological Clinic, psychologist Dave Plude sees clients from Sandstone to Ely, and from Brainerd to Grand Marais. For many clients, the use of video or phone sessions has been a more convenient option in many ways. Plude said once clients overcame the learning curve of the technology, many people would rather call in from home or their cars than drive up to four hours round-trip for an hourlong session.

“It’s been kind of fun,” he said. “It’s enjoyable to be able to offer good clinical care to people in smaller towns who might not have as much access to it historically.”

It looks like virtual is here to stay for a while…

While telehealth has been offered at many clinics for a while now, it’s never been used as much as it has been in the pandemic. At Arrowhead, Plude said last summer, 80% of their sessions were via video or phone, and they went to 100% virtual last fall during the surge of COVID-19 cases. While many are now returning to in-person sessions, Plude said quite a few are fine with staying virtual. Some will start sessions in person, then switch to telehealth after they get comfortable with their therapist.

A permanent change in policy would make it easier…

U.S. senators introduced a bill at the beginning of May to continue access to telehealth services with Medicare after the pandemic. CONNECT for Health is one of more than 20 bills introduced this Congress about the future of telehealth.

But regardless of the specifics of insurance coverage or other future rules related to telehealth therapy services, all three therapists said they plan to continue offering video sessions at their clinics.

Telehealth is here to stay in rural Minnesota

WCCO TV reports

WCCO found the successes and the future of the practice for some patients in outstate Minnesota.

A former firefighter and medic, it was a bad fall after retirement that put Bart Cedergren in a wheelchair.

He lives up north with his wife. The three doctor visits a month could take much of the day, but are now done in a fraction of the time because they’re all online.

“Telemedicine I think is the wave of the future,” Cedergren said. “The only thing we go in for these days are basically lab.”

Family Nurse Practitioner Janelle Terhaar now dedicates one full office day a week in Long Prairie to her telehealth patients.

“We went from maybe having one or two a month to now we’re maybe having steady patients every day,” Terhaar said.

From parents with a sick child, behavioral health, and an older population, Terhaar says patient profiles come from all over and that even web cams don’t lie.

Telehealth is one way to help mental health resources reach rural Minnesota

The Bemidji Pioneer reports on Mental Health month…

May marks Mental Health Awareness Month in the United States, and during the last year, the topic has been increasingly brought to the forefront due to the coronavirus pandemic.

They recognize the challenge of reaching rural areas and the advantage telehealth brings

Outside of hub communities in the state like Bemidji, though, mental health resources can be scarce. Mulvihill said getting treatment options into more rural areas has been an effort by the organization recently.

“It’s certainly something we acknowledge that we have to just do a lot better on,” Mulvihill said. “It is a lot harder to find a mental health provider in Greater Minnesota, it’s just the reality. I think there have been some movement around telehealth certainly during the pandemic and we have really been advocating to maintain the things that were kind of made temporary with telehealth.”

While Mulvihill acknowledged telehealth options aren’t a fix for everyone, Mulvihill said it does provide a solution for a segment of the population.

Mayo Clinic doctor says Digital Healthcare is Healthcare

KTTC Rochester reports…

Three Mayo Clinic health professionals spoke virtually Tuesday about the advantages of remote care and the future of the health care provider-patient relationship.

Telehealth has been growing…

At its height, the pandemic is blamed for an 80 to 90% drop of in-person health care appointments.

“Beyond the height of the pandemic, we have witnessed a decline in the use of digital health care but not back to the pre-pandemic levels,” Damaerschalk said.

A new law in Arizona is expanding the definition of telehealth to be more inclusive, meaning providers will be compensated for helping patients when they aren’t in-person or virtually face-to-face.

“From a reimbursement standpoint, both government and commercial payors are reimbursing telemedicine activities on the same basis as in-person activities,” Ommen said.

The trio of doctors hopes to see that law adopted in Minnesota and Florida as well.

The doctors were very supportive…

Damaerschalk also recounted his difficulty to tell the difference between telehealth and in-person practices from a provider standpoint.

“I was completing documentation on my patients, and I had actually forgotten in several instances whether I had seen that patient in person or if I had seen them by telemedicine,” Damaerschalk said. “I paused for a moment, because to me that resonated, as it should, that digital health care is health care.”