Norman County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 72

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Norman County ranks 72 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Norman County does not rank well; one telling tract ranking is subscription rate rank at 84. That means a lot of people are choosing not to get broadband. That might indicate a need to help county residents better understand the need and use of broadband to build a culture of use.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Norman County Ranking
Access to 100/20 66
No bachelors 56
No HS degree 59
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 45
Below poverty (last 12 months) 29
Disability 41
No computer 79
No broadband access 38
No subscription 84
Overall average 72

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Nobles County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 69

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Nobles County ranks 69 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Nicollet has some low-ranking areas, especially high school graduation (rank 87), bachelor’s degree (rank 82) and computer access (rank 82). It seems like that might be an opportunity for an initiative or focus on helping people get a use technology (a computer and broadband access) for formal education. They have had digital equity programs in the past, which should mean there’s local expertise and engagement to tap into.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Nobles County Ranking
Access to 100/20 41
No bachelors 82
No HS degree 87
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 75
Below poverty (last 12 months) 72
Disability 34
No computer 82
No broadband access 1
No subscription 64
Overall average 69

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Greater Round Lake Community Association Technology Education for Round Lake Project support for technology education classes at the Round Lake Community Center
Independent School District 518 (Worthington area) Changing Main Street through Technology and Education Project support for the Changing Main Street through Technology and Education project, which includes classes on succession planning and technology for area business owners and educational opportunities for individuals interested in running a small business
Independent School District 518 (Worthington area) Community-Wide Reading Through myON Digital Library Project support to implement the use of the myON digital library in the Worthington area for the benefit of preschoolers and their families
Independent School District 518 (Worthington area) Digital Inclusion Through Community Ed Project support for online marketing, technology and digital literacy training for area residents
Minnesota West Community & Technical College – Worthington Introduction to Digital Literacy Project support to develop a two-credit college course on digital literacy targeted toward high school and college students
Nobles County BAC Fiber Access Project support to bring fiber to the Biotechnology Advancement Center (BAC), its teleconferencing room, and the business incubators in the Worthington Industrial Park
Nobles County Feasibility Study Project support to conduct a feasibility study to gather information and provide a decision making path for local officials to meet the goal of ubiquitous broadband coverage across Nobles County
Nobles County NEON Hot Spots Project support to provide more accessible, reliable and affordable access to internet services for the rural residents of Nobles County by providing up to nine hot spots
Nobles County Regional data center vision Project support to determine the feasibility of developing a regional data center and disaster recovery site at the former county jail in downtown Worthington
Nobles County Integration Collaborative Digital Literacy for Diverse Communities Project support to provide digital literacy training for diverse communities via a train-the-trainer approach (ethnic leaders will learn to teach basic computer skills in their native language)
Nobles County Library iPads for Public Use Capital support for mobile devices within two branches of the Nobles County Library for patron usage and check-out to community groups and preschools

 

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation. (Nobles County has participated in multiple Blandin cohorts.):

Program Owner Program Name Description
Nobles County Integration Collaborative Computer Lab and Classes Nobles County Integration Collaborative will purchase equipment for a small computer lab, as well as a set of laptops that will also be housed at NCIC, but can be checked out by area agencies for training purposes. The grant will also be used to purchase a wireless access point for the West Learning Center, which serves many immigrant families in the community. Nobles County Integration Collaborative will make the new computers available to the public during regular office hours (five days and two evenings per week).  Additionally, the grant funds will be used to pay instructors to teach basic computer and Internet classes in two languages: Spanish and Karen. NCIC staff will also utilize the computers with families as they participate in college and career exploration programs offered at NCIC and with adult English language learners.
Nobles County Integration Collaborative Cultural Awareness and Integration Grant Nobles County Integration Collaborative will work with Cable TV3 on  a project where high school students will learn how to use a video camera and video editing equipment.  The students first project will be to film and edit a video where they will interview adults about their heritage or immigration experiences, which will be shared with the community on Cable TV3 and in other settings.  The video equipment will be used to record and share other Culture Corner events in the future.
St. Mary’s School 21st Century Technology St. Mary’s School 21st Century Technology will implement new technology tools throughout the 2011 school year, with the first priority and immediate need of providing constant Internet access to the students, staff and volunteers. To better engage students in classroom projects and discussions, St. Mary’s is working to incorporate new interactive technology, such as a SmartBoard, in the second grade classroom.  This technology will allow students to work hands-on with a variety of online and downloadable activities. The final goal is to provide parents, students, and staff with a new user-friendly and content rich website that will also be used to inform parents during the school’s transition towards its paperless initiative.
WGTN-TV (ISD 518) Website Development WGTN-TV will make available live and taped broadcasts of local daily programming including government meetings and community events via web streaming for those without cable TV access.
Worthington ISD 518 iPad Integration Using Wireless Broadband Worthington ISD 518 will provide interactive tools for teacher and student use in the classroom through the purchase of iPads, and expand broadband capabilities with additional wireless access points throughout the district.  The iPads will be available to all students throughout the culturally and socioeconomically diverse district.  The grant will allow for training on the use of interactive tools and wireless devices to all constituents in District 518, including community members with no children enrolled in the schools.  This project will complement the district’s plans to enhance broadband infrastructure in the schools.
Worthington Regional Economic Development Commission Portable Bioscience Labs The Portable Bioscience Lab project will utilize advanced technology to transmit training and business information at a base site and throughout southwest Minnesota.  The primary purpose is to work within the agricultural industry, and more specifically in the bioscience area, to promote training and business innovation.  The project will provide digital learning and career exploration opportunities for high school students, increase skills for the employees in the identified industries, and create a network of information sharing.

Nicollet County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 17

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Nicollet County ranks 17 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Nicollet County ranks well for digital equity. It looks like their access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up ranks lower in comparison. So it’s something to consideration. Otherwise, they are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Nicollet County Ranking
Access to 100/20 44
No bachelors 10
No HS degree 21
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 27
Below poverty (last 12 months) 34
Disability 46
No computer 18
No broadband access 45
No subscription 15
Overall average 17

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Murray County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 62

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Murray County ranks 62 out of 87 counties for digital equity. A ranking of 62 is certainly near the bottom of the pack but not worst, unfortunately the ranking for access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up is 84. That’s an indication that that deploying better broadband is still a priority, although that doesn’t mean that access to devices and digital training isn’t important too.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Murray County Ranking
Access to 100/20 84
No bachelors 50
No HS degree 66
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 19
Below poverty (last 12 months) 10
Disability 56
No computer 58
No broadband access 1
No subscription 74
Overall average 62

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Mower County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 51

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Mower County ranks 51 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Mower is pretty middle of the pack. Ranking for high school graduation is low at 82 rank. The rest is again, middle to lower ranking. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Mower County Ranking
Access to 100/20 46
No bachelors 46
No HS degree 82
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 73
Below poverty (last 12 months) 73
Disability 43
No computer 54
No broadband access 5
No subscription 40
Overall average 51

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Austin Aspires Focus Groups with Traditionally Underrepresented Populations Better understand the technology needs of diverse groups in the Austin Area by hosting a series of focus groups with underrepresented groups, including but not limited to senior citizens, non-English language speakers, and individuals with disabilities and their caregivers.
Austin Aspires Translation Software Bridge the communication gap in the Austin Area through the use of translation software. Austin Public Schools currently serves families representing 45 home languages, and nearly 50% of students identify as a member of an ethnic minority. Translation assistance is needed throughout the community.
Austin Public Library and Mayo Clinic Public Access Privacy Rooms Facilitate access to and use of technology through the creation of at least three “Zoom Rooms” strategically placed around the city that people can use to conduct private business including job interviews, parent-teacher meetings, medical appointments, etc.
Austin Public Schools Community Ed. Community Digital Literacy Training Build digital literacy skills around the community by hosting digital literacy training classes. Targeted populations include the elderly, ESL families, and people wanting to improve their work skills.
Development Corporation of Austin Small Business Resiliency Through Technology Help small businesses innovate, update, and flourish by promoting the availability of Mower County’s micro-grant program. Participating small businesses will receive a technology assessment to pinpoint resiliency gaps in operations, marketing, or online presence, and have access to matching grants to address issues.
Hormel Nature Center Community Tree Nursery Promote the creative application of technology and address environmental justice by designing and constructing a gravel bed tree nursery to grow trees to augment loss associated with aging and dying trees throughout the community. The nursery will be used as an educational tool through videos, photos, and articles shared online.
United Way of Mower County Affordable Connectivity Program Promotion Connect qualifying families to affordable internet service by promoting the Affordable Connectivity Program through various community engagement efforts, including assisting them with the application process.

 

Mille Lacs County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 81

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Mille Lacs County ranks 81 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Mille Lacs is clearly near the bottom ranking. But they are evenly at the bottom so they are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. The good news is that they have worked on digital equity in the past and will have local experts and some community engagement.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Mille Lacs County Ranking
Access to 100/20 62
No bachelors 83
No HS degree 76
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 65
Below poverty (last 12 months) 70
Disability 82
No computer 80
No broadband access 64
No subscription 54
Overall average 81

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation

Project Owner Project Name Description
East Central Regional Library Digital Literacy Computer Training Project support to provide no-cost technology training in communities of Mille Lacs County in rural Minnesota as part of the Broadband Program
Mille Lacs County Community Portal Website Project support to create and maintain a website to provide citizens with a comprehensive source of information, promote area businesses, governments and nonprofits and increase web presence in rural Minnesota as part of the Broadband Program
Mille Lacs County Public Hot Spots / WiFi Project support to develop and market wi-fi hot spots in Mille Lacs County as part of the Broadband Program
Mille Lacs County Business and Organization Technology Training Provide a series of technology training workshops throughout Mille Lacs County, to include businesses, nonprofits, chambers and local units of governments to help them improve their online presence and in social media as part of the Broadband Program
ISD 912 Milaca Public Schools Wi-Fi on Buses Project support to Increase rural student access to the Internet by installing wifi-equipment on a select number of school buses in the Milaca School District in rural Minnesota as part of the Broadband Program
Mille Lacs County WiFi Hot Spots Project support to create five new public wi-fi hotspots within the county as part of the Broadband Program in rural Minnesota
Mille Lacs County Computer Distribution to Low-Income Families Capital support to distribute 100 computers to low-income families in Mille Lacs County as part of the Broadband Program in rural Minnesota
Mille Lacs County GIS Connect MN and Affordability Layer Project support to conduct analysis around broadband availability and affordability using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as part of the Broadband Program in rural Minnesota
Mille Lacs County MLC WiFi Computer Lab Project support to create a public access computer lab at the Courthouse with computers placed at two additional locations as part of the Broadband Program in rural Minnesota
Mille Lacs County Interactive Online Meetings Capital support to create two video conference centers through which citizens can participate in public meetings held at the courthouse as part of the Broadband Program in rural Minnesota
ISD 912 Milaca Public Schools Wi-Fi on Buses Capital support for the purchase and operation of 12 wi-fi routers for school buses across four districts so students can use travel time for homework and increase their chances of succeeding in school as part of the Broadband Program in rural Minnesota
Mille Lacs County BCBP Marketing materials to raise awareness of broadband Project support to develop marketing materials to raise awareness of the importance of broadband in rural Minnesota as part of the Broadband Program

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation (Mille Lacs was involved in multiple Blandin community cohorts):

Project Owner Project Name Description
Aitkin County Web Diagnostics for Small Businesses Project support to increase the knowledge and use of e-commerce and social media tools for small businesses in Aitkin County
Aitkin County Web Diagnostics for Small Businesses, Part II Project support to provide technical assistance to businesses to market their products through online presence and social media
Audubon Center of the North Woods Online Public Access to Energy Data Project support to connect various alternative energy facilities into a unified network for data collection and analysis for integration into curricula and energy management systems
Depot Studios Expanding Access and Learning Opportunities Project support to provide computer access with a Wi-Fi hotspot at an artist, craft and entrepreneurial center in Isle
East Central RDC Broadband Inventory and Assessment Project support to conduct an analysis of the region’s existing broadband assets and services to inform community leaders about potential gaps and opportunities
East Central RDC Township Broadband Enhancements Project support to work with up to five rural townships to identify and implement broadband solutions providing public access in areas with little to no existing broadband access
Isle Recreation and Education Center Expanding Technology and Educational Opportunities Project support to provide computer classes and a Wi-Fi public access site in the Mille Lacs lakes area

Meeker County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 50

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Meeker County ranks 50 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Their ranking is midrange across the board. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Meeker County Ranking
Access to 100/20 33
No bachelors 61
No HS degree 48
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 31
Below poverty (last 12 months) 13
Disability 30
No computer 40
No broadband access 39
No subscription 51
Overall average 50

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Martin County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 60

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Martin County ranks 60 out of 87 counties for digital equity. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. Their standing with poverty ranking, school attainment and disability will help build a case with potential funders. The good news is that they have been working on digital equity in the past and will have local experts and some community engagement.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Martin County Ranking
Access to 100/20 38
No bachelors 60
No HS degree 33
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 54
Below poverty (last 12 months) 69
Disability 64
No computer 72
No broadband access 26
No subscription 49
Overall average 60

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
ISD 2752 Fairmont Area Schools Digital Responsibility Project support for the Digital Responsibility project to encourage responsible use of electronic media and inform students, parents, teachers, adults with disabilities, business people and community members about consequences and best practices
ISD 2752 Fairmont Community Ed and Recreation Fairmont Area Community Calendar Project support to develop and market a shared community calendar and facilities scheduler
Martin County App Camp Project support for a technology learning workshop on mobile app creation for students
Martin County Wi-Fi Hotspots Throughout Martin County Project support to create a network of Wi-Fi hotspots throughout Martin County
Martin County Robust Network Feasibility Fund Grant Project support for a feasibility study to choose and prioritize programs and initiatives to stimulate development of state-of-the-art broadband networks throughout Martin County
Martin County Social Media and Online Presence Skill Training for Business Project support to provide businesses in the Martin County area relevant training in social media and online presence
Martin County Technology Education and Training Project support to provide broadband technology training opportunities for Martin County residents
Martin County EDA Devices for Martin County Schools Capital support to provide a variety of devices for local school districts allowing them to upgrade their use of technology

 

Marshall County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 61

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Marshall County ranks 61 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Marshall’s ranking is diverse but an important stand out is ranking 83 for access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up. So deploying better broadband will have to remain a priority.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Marshall County Ranking
Access to 100/20 83
No bachelors 57
No HS degree 75
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 11
Below poverty (last 12 months) 9
Disability 37
No computer 53
No broadband access 60
No subscription 60
Overall average 61

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Mahnomen County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 85

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Mahnomen County ranks 85 out of 87 counties for digital equity. The good news is that investments will be made in digital equity in the next few years and Mahnomen will make a good candidate with rankings so low. The other good news is that Mahnomen has worked on digital equity in the past and will have local experts and a history of programming from which to learn.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Mahnomen County Ranking
Access to 100/20 77
No bachelors 87
No HS degree 84
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 87
Below poverty (last 12 months) 87
Disability 74
No computer 87
No broadband access 54
No subscription 82
Overall average 85

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
City of Mahnomen City Hall Conference Room Tech Upgrades Improve the effectiveness and efficiency of community meetings by upgrading technology in the Mahnomen City Hall conference room, allowing them to host virtual meetings. The room will continue to be available to various community organizations.
Gizhiigin Arts Incubator Youth Asset Map Build new technology knowledge and skills among youth in 4-6th grades by conducting workshops where students will create 3-5 informational QR spots around Mahnomen educating visitors about attractions and traditions.
Helping Hands Food Shelf Computers and Inventory Software Improve the efficiency of Helping Hands Food Shelf and improve access to food for community members by providing a computer and implementing a software program to track inventory and use, including allowing clients to pre-order food.
Lake Agassiz Regional Library Library Technology Upgrade Increase library-users’ access to technology through the purchase of a new machine capable of color printing, copying, scanning, and faxing.
Mahnomen County EDA Co-Working Services Launch Provide support and services for entrepreneurs and small business owners by providing free access for two years to the co-working space for White Earth Nation tribal members and other qualifying Mahnomen County entrepreneurs.
Mahnomen County EDA EDA Website and Digital Logos Increase visibility and access to Mahnomen County EDA programs, events, and resources by building a new EDA website. This project includes creating a digital brand identity for the EDA and City of Mahnomen, and upgraded technology for clients and staff.
White Earth Tribal Community College Bookstore Marketing Project Foster cultural revitalization by increasing the community’s access to locally made beading and crafting supplies and materials through the creation of a digital storefront for the White Earth Tribal Community College Bookstore.
White Earth Tribal Community College WETCC Digital Mktg Geofencing Campaign Market White Earth Tribal Community College cultural programs and increase student enrollment through a digital marketing campaign that utilizes videography and geofencing to target specific demographics.

 

McLeod County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 32

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

McLeod County ranks 28 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Ranking of 20 for broadband access at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up, which is not bad, nor is ranking of 20 for computer ownership and 23 ranking for broadband subscriptions. In fact, the only ranking that might be concerning is the bachelor’s degree. An interesting hook might be to use the technology to encourage and help folks to further their education.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

McLeod County Ranking
Access to 100/20 20
No bachelors 68
No HS degree 38
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 30
Below poverty (last 12 months) 20
Disability 40
No computer 20
No broadband access 31
No subscription 23
Overall average 32

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Lyon County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 28

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Lyon County ranks 28 out of 87 counties for digital equity. A ranking of 28 is not bad at all but diving into the different demographic tracts is most interesting. The access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up is 27, which is also not bad and computer ownership (rank 16) and broadband subscription (rank 18) is good. But the ranking for high school degree (60) and population living below poverty (70) is concerning. It might make sense for Lyon County to look at helping use the existing infrastructure to encourage education and workforce training pursuits. Increased skills might help lift up portions of the population.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Lyon County Ranking
Access to 100/20 27
No bachelors 27
No HS degree 60
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 77
Below poverty (last 12 months) 79
Disability 9
No computer 16
No broadband access 1
No subscription 18
Overall average 28

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Plum Creek Library System
507-376-5803
ask@plumcreeklibrary.net

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Lincoln County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 65

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Lincoln County ranks 65 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Their lowest rankings are related to technology: access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 10 up (rank 80), computer access (rank 73) and broadband subscription rates (78). Yet the poverty rate is ranked much higher, which might indicate that affordability isn’t a big issue, but residents do need to see the value. Getting better broadband is one solution but so it building an interest with local residents through digital training. They have a history of digital equity programming, which will help tap into local expertise and engagement.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Lincoln County Ranking
Access to 100/20 80
No bachelors 54
No HS degree 57
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 42
Below poverty (last 12 months) 52
Disability 50
No computer 73
No broadband access 1
No subscription 78
Overall average 65

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Development Services, Inc. “At Home in Lincoln County” Website Promote and market Lincoln County to residents and visitors by expanding the current countywide website to include a comprehensive overview of the county’s communities, resources for residents and visitors, business information, and events and activities.
Development Services, Inc. Ivanhoe Broadband Community Survey Determine Ivanhoe residents’ satisfaction with current broadband offerings and gauge interest in a potential fiber optic network by conducting a community broadband survey.
Lincoln County Public Wi-Fi Access Increase access to the internet by providing public Wi-Fi access at parks and other spots where people gather around the county.
Tyler Public Library Internet Safety Programs Educate parents, students, and community members on internet safety by conducting training programs on Social Media Safety and Internet Fraud and Scams.

Le Sueur County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 26

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Le  Sueur County ranks 26 out of 87 counties for digital equity. They are ranking in the top third. They have been working on better broadband for a few years, so they have local experts and momentum. Their rankings are pretty even across the board so they are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Le Sueur County Ranking
Access to 100/20 36
No bachelors 39
No HS degree 28
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 12
Below poverty (last 12 months) 25
Disability 24
No computer 35
No broadband access 12
No subscription 25
Overall average 26

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Le Sueur County Broadband Initiative Community Technology Assistance Improve access to technology throughout the community by increasing the number of public access sites and training opportunities with an emphasis on Zoom and other applications for community connectivity.
Le Sueur County Broadband Initiative LCBI Communications Amplify the work of the LCBI through enhanced communication and marketing, including improving access to county-wide calendars and offering integrated community education classes.
Le Sueur County Broadband Initiative Technology Enhancements Improve the effectiveness of the Le Sueur County Broadband Initiative (LCBI) through the use of Google Suites for Business, including training for all team members.
Le Sueur County Broadband Initiative & Region Nine Le Sueur County Economic Development Forum Address the lack of economic development at the county-level by conducting a needs-assessment and holding a summer event for businesses across the county.
Tri City School District Broadband Coalition Fellowship Enhance and support broadband planning efforts and to support the creation of digital navigation projects that will support residents, businesses, and libraries through the hire of a two-year Lead for Minnesota Fellow.

Lake of the Woods County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 82

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Lake of the Woods County ranks 82 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Lake of the Woods is near the bottom of the list. Their ranking for computer ownership (80) and lack of broadband subscription (86) are particularly low. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. They have a history of working on digital training, which will help them find local expertise and experience.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Lake of the Woods County Ranking
Access to 100/20 63
No bachelors 74
No HS degree 35
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 58
Below poverty (last 12 months) 59
Disability 54
No computer 80
No broadband access 71
No subscription 86
Overall average 82

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
LakeWood Health Center LakeWood Technology Project Project support for the Lakewood Technology project to provide communications access for patients and residents in rural Minnesota as part of the Broadband Program
Lake of the Woods Senior Citizens Council, Inc Lake of the Woods Digital Inclusion Project Project support to provide and expand digital inclusion within Lake of the Woods County to include multiple public computer/internet sites and public Wi-Fi as part of the Broadband Program
Lake of the Woods Economic Development Authority Social Media Rural Connection Project support to enhance knowledge and use of the internet for Lake of the Woods County residents in rural Minnesota as part of the Broadband Program
Lake of the Woods Senior Citizens Council, Inc Lake of the Woods Digital Inclusion Project – Phase 2 Capital support to increase public access to computers and the internet by providing more computers and internet access points at several public and nonprofit locations as part of the Broadband Program in rural Minnesota
Lake of the Woods County Wi Fi Hotspots Project support to increase public access to the internet and increase traffic and business for local establishments; to provide additional training to businesses and residents and support for Google site claiming as part of the Broadband Program
Lake of the Woods School ISD 390 Lake of the Woods School Digital Expansion Project Project support to increase access to technology for students and area residents
Pioneer Youth Center Baudette Youth Broadband Expansion Project support to provide interactive learning experiences for at-risk youth through access to Wi-Fi to enhance student success