Lac qui Parle County Broadband Profile 2022: Green rating: Ranking out 4 of 87

Rank: 4
Code: Green
(See Blandin Foundation interactive map)

Lac Qui Parle (LqP) County: top ranked and getting better

LqP County ranks 4 for broadband access and 81 for digital equity out of 87 counties. They have had more than 99 percent coverage to broadband of 100 Mbps down and 20 up since we started tracking. They have 5 households without access to broadband at that speed. Estimates indicate that it will cost $45,000 to get to ubiquitous broadband in the county.

County Housing Unit Density Number of Housing Units 100/20 Mbps houses unserved Cost to close the gap
Lac qui Parle 4.5 3,471 99.86 5  $              45,192.42

Lac qui Parle (LqP) County received an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) award in 2010 that brought Fiber to the Home (FTTH) to most of the county. They have been well served since then and are able to make improvements. That is why they get an easy green code. But their digital equity ranking is 81. If they get funding for technology, they should consider investment in digital equity. That being said, they were early partners with the Blandin Foundation and have a history of great programs, such as the Computer Commuter akin to a bookmobile but with computers and Internet access.

Broadband Access:

  2022 2021 2020 2019 2018 2017
100/20 (2026 goal) 99.86 99.83 99.57 97.35 97.35 99.36
25/3 (2022 goal) 99.86 99.84 99.57 97.35 97.35 99.36

Digital Equity:

LqP County ranks 41 out of 87 for digital equity. (See full Digital Equity Profile)

LqP County ranks 81 out of 87 for computer ownership. 86 percent of homes have a computer of device as compared to statewide ownership of 95.5 percent.

Past grants:

  • 2009, Blandin Foundation funded a feasibility study for LqP County and Farmers Telephone Cooperative. The feasibility study’s engineering, operational, and market development plans were later used to support the partners’ successful ARRA funding
  • 2010 The county and Farmers were awarded a $9.6 million ARRA award
  • 2017 – Farmers Mutual Telephone – City of Watson and SW Lac qui Parle County FTTP – GRANT $760,501
  • 2015 – MVTV Wireless Middle Mile – Grant award: $808,080

Checklist:

  • Find more articles on broadband in Lac qui Parle. (http://tinyurl.com/zc2tfay)
  • 100/20 ranking: 4 (same)
  • Has worked with Blandin: yes
  • Has received a MN Broadband grant: yes
  • Household density: 4.5

I am doing the annual look at broadband in each county – based on maps from the Office of Broadband Development and news gathered from the last year. I’m looking at progress toward the 2022 (25 Mbps down and 3 Mbps up) and 2026 (100 Mbps down and 20 Mbps up) and will code each:

  • Red (yikes)
  • Yellow (warning)
  • Green (good shape)

Yellow Medicine County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 58

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Yellow Medicine County ranks 58 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Their ranking for access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up is 68, which is not great. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them but with the lower ranking access to broadband, they will want to keep a focus on getting better broadband. The good news is that they have been working on digital equity, so they have the local expertise and community engagement.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Yellow Medicine County Ranking
Access to 100/20 68
No bachelors 71
No HS degree 63
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 51
Below poverty (last 12 months) 63
Disability 53
No computer 38
No broadband access 1
No subscription 45
Overall average 58

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

More Resources:

  • Courtney Dietsche
    Library Director
    Cloquet Public Library
    320 14th Street
    Cloquet, MN  55720
    218-879-1531
    dietsche@alslib.info
  • Michael Cary, Superintendent
    Cloquet Public Schools
    (218) 879-6721
    mcary@isd94.org

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Upper Minnesota Valley RDC Public Sector Broadband Feasibility Study Project support for a study to determine the feasibility of constructing a fiber network connecting all public buildings in the Upper Minnesota Valley Region
Upper Minnesota Valley RDC Regional Technology Team Project support to create a regional IT professional network to ignite cross-industry collaborations so the region can fully integrate technology in day-to-day efforts and large scale planning efforts
Upper Minnesota Valley RDC IT Connect II Project support to maintain a regional IT professional network in the Upper Minnesota Valley region
Upper Minnesota Valley RDC Rural Connect Project support to create a shared marketing message and implementation strategy for the region in an effort to attract people and investment
Upper Minnesota Valley RDC Rural Connect Phase II Project support for the Rural Connect Phase II
Project Owner Project Name Description
Big Stone County Public Internet Access Project The Public Internet Access Project will provide online access to government information and resources including forms, county highway project status, and GIS information. Online access will increase awareness, options and citizen control in how they interact with county government.
Dawson / Boyd Schools Community Digital Literacy Community Digital Literacy will connect businesses, community members and students to support the creation of a digitally literate community through a Multimedia Collaboration Center, a Student Tech Team, and a hybrid (online and classroom) Teacher/Community Training Academy.
Johnson Memorial Health Services HomeStream HomeStream will demonstrate the potential for using broadband‐based remote support tools and enhanced family engagement with aging populations to define appropriate visits/hospitalizations and to achieve increased medication adherence for better health outcomes.
Lac qui Parle County Economic Development Authority (EDA) Computer Commuter Computer Commuter is an innovative mobile computer lab that increases the digital literacy of area residents and businesses, advances knowledge workers, and promotes broadband availability and digital inclusion.
Ortonville School / Ortonville EDA Community Broadband Strategies Community Broadband Strategies will increase Internet usage by 1) giving businesses an understanding of the uses and benefits access provides, 2) exposing community members to the information that they can obtain, 3) encouraging a viable economic community and a school system that uses technology, and 4) involving youth in the community’s development, thereby encouraging them to return as adults.
Pioneer Public Television Video on Rural Broadband Use During the first phase of production, Pioneer will be developing a segment of approximately 14 minutes focusing on western Minnesota individuals and organizations affected by a lack of broadband availability.  This segment will be produced in the third and fourth quarter of 2011 for submission to the national public television program, Need to Know, and will form the basis for a longer program of up to 28 minutes.
Upper Minnesota Valley RDC Community Websites This project will assist two cities (Bellingham and Echo) in the creation of community websites.

Wright County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 10

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Wright County ranks 10 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Wright County is in good shape. Their demographic rankings are higher than the technology-related tracts, so there may be opportunity for improvement. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. Their standing with poverty ranking, school attainment and disability will help build a case with potential funders.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Wright County Ranking
Access to 100/20 23
No bachelors 20
No HS degree 12
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 4
Below poverty (last 12 months) 3
Disability 8
No computer 11
No broadband access 47
No subscription 10
Overall average 10

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Winona County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 20

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Winona County ranks 20 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Winona’s over all rank is not bad; the individual tracts are all over the place. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. The good news is that they have been working on digital equity, so they have the local expertise and community engagement.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Winona County Ranking
Access to 100/20 42
No bachelors 14
No HS degree 40
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 76
Below poverty (last 12 months) 81
Disability 35
No computer 14
No broadband access 8
No subscription 17
Overall average 20

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Southeastern Libraries Cooperating (SELCO)
(507) 288-5513
helpdesk@selco.info

Schools

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
City of Winona Digital Front Door Website This project will fund the redesign of the City of Winona’s website to function as a ‘digital front door,’ which will increase its usability and appeal to a wider audience.  The redesign will include a new layout for the City’s website, add four new information tabs on the front page, and provide links to other prominent websites in the community.
City of Winona Innovative Public Access Innovative Public Access will provide free Wi-Fi at four public locations in the City of Winona, wireless service in all public meeting rooms in City Hall, and web streaming video for Council chamber meetings (City Council, school board, etc.)
City of Winona Winona PR Project Create public relations material that will promote Winona’s MIRC efforts and the City’s Intelligent Community assets.  The material will be published on the City’s website and will be the first webpage that users see when logging into the City’s four wireless internet portals.  This project will also produce a press release disbursed to targeted media outlets in the regional area (La Crosse, WI to Rochester, MN to Minneapolis/St. Paul), promotional materials for the Digital Perch website produced for the Online Support Center Website project, and content for the City’s Wireless portal at Levee Park.
Project FINE Technology Education for Immigrants and Refugees Technology Education for Immigrants and Refugees will provide customized Internet training in four phases: 1) Introduction to Technology, 2) Internet Access and Tools, 3) Access to Home Computers, and 4) Continuing Training. These classes will introduce Winona immigrants and refugees to the Internet and computers so they will be comfortable independently accessing the training options provided by the Winona Workforce Center and potentially the Minnesota Learning Commons.
Winona Workforce Center E-Travel Center The Winona Workforce Center will purchase four laptops and one laptop case for the E-Travel Center, a mobile laptop lab that can be set up at various community locations. The lab provides introduction to computers and basic Word and Excel tools training.
Winona Workforce Center Online Support Center The Workforce Center, in coordination with a web developer at Southeast Technical College will create a website that offers support to businesses exploring e-commerce, social media, and other internet business applications.  In particular, the web developer will offer direct support through a blog on the website.  The website will be a resource for individuals who have recently completed the Extension online training, for individuals who have completed new business training at the Workforce Center, and for small business in general.

Wilkin County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 42

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Wilkin County ranks 42 out of 87 counties for digital equity. The standout ranking for Wilkin is access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up at rank 85. The demographic tracts rank much better. There are three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. Wilkin could benefit from looking at all but they really need to focus on better access to broadband.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Wilkin County Ranking
Access to 100/20 85
No bachelors 33
No HS degree 6
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 14
Below poverty (last 12 months) 31
Disability 75
No computer 32
No broadband access 13
No subscription 46
Overall average 42

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Watonwan County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 79

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Watonwan County ranks 79 out of 87 counties for digital equity. A surprising ranking for Watonwan, they rank 17 for access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up. That’s clearly out of line with their overall ranking. So they have good access and yet, their broadband subscription rate rank 83. There are three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. Watonwan needs to work on access to devices and the skills to use them.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Watonwan County Ranking
Access to 100/20 17
No bachelors 76
No HS degree 86
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 70
Below poverty (last 12 months) 75
Disability 57
No computer 75
No broadband access 15
No subscription 83
Overall average 79

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Traverse des Sioux Library Cooperative
(507) 625-6169
support@tds.lib.mn.us

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Waseca County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 23

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Waseca County ranks 23 out of 87 counties for digital equity. The standout ranking for Waseca is access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up at rank 73. The demographic tract rankings are much more middle of the road but without access technology can’t make much of a difference. They need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them but they need to really focus on getting better broadband.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Waseca County Ranking
Access to 100/20 73
No bachelors 49
No HS degree 34
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 48
Below poverty (last 12 months) 39
Disability 21
No computer 47
No broadband access 1
No subscription 21
Overall average 23

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

Wadena County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 77

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Wadena County ranks 77 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Their ranking for access to broadband as speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up is actually quite good at 31 – but everything else is pretty low-ranked especially poverty rate below 150 percent (rank 85) and no college degree (rank 86). They are in a position where they will want to focus on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. And really focus on making sure people have computers and the skills to use technology. The good news is that they have been working on digital equity, so they have the local expertise and community engagement.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Wadena County Ranking
Access to 100/20 31
No bachelors 86
No HS degree 68
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 85
Below poverty (last 12 months) 80
Disability 81
No computer 85
No broadband access 37
No subscription 66
Overall average 77

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp Brainerd Lakes Area Talent Recruiter Launch Project support to launch a talent recruitment program to market the area’s technology services industry jobs to ensure a highly qualified workforce is available to the region’s business community
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp Enhanced Marketing of Our Technology Sector Project support to implement the Tech Services marketing plan
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp High-Tech Center Research and “Next Steps” Outline Project support to determine the feasibility/strategy to create and sustain a high tech Live/Work Center in the Brainerd Lakes region
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp Tech Ready Brainerd Lakes Area Hackfest Project support for a two-day hack fest to share information, use local skills to problem solve local challenges, and develop new technology solutions
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp Video Conferencing System Capital support for video conferencing equipment for use by area businesses and organizations in CTC Technology Room at the BLAEDC/Chamber Offices
Consolidated Telephone Co. & Region Five Dev. Commission Economic Impact of Broadband Infrastructure Expansion & Subscription Project support to measure the changes in the lives of new CTC broadband customers who are now benefitting from a fiber expansion project supported by the DEED Border-to-Border Broadband grant program
Essentia Health Foundation Launch Telehealth Development & Implementation Project support to provide tele-health training sessions in Resilient Region Five’s five-county area and on the Leech Lake Reservation
ISD 181 – Brainerd Public Schools CTC Schools Technology Bundle Project support for technology and mobile devices in the Early Childhood and Family Education programs
MN State Community & Tech College-Wadena “What the Tech?” Technology Expo Project support to host a one-day tech expo event in Wadena that will combine active learning by MNSCU students and displays and seminars for the general public
The Brainerd Baxter Youth Center PCs for People Youth Project Project support to continue to train youth to refurbish computers and distribute them to low-income families in the Brainerd area
Todd-Wadena Electric Cooperative Rural Broadband Feasibility Study Project support for a feasibility study to extend broadband services to the under and un-served areas of the Todd Wadena Electric Cooperative service area

Wabasha County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 24

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Wabasha County ranks 24 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Wabasha County is in the top third ranking of the counties. Their rankings are fairly consistent. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Wabasha County Ranking
Access to 100/20 39
No bachelors 34
No HS degree 32
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 20
Below poverty (last 12 months) 18
Disability 65
No computer 30
No broadband access 19
No subscription 26
Overall average 24

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Traverse County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 71

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Traverse County ranks 71 out of 87 counties for digital equity. The outstanding ranking for Traverse is ranking 86 for access to broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up. They need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them but they need to focus on getting better broadband.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Traverse County Ranking
Access to 100/20 86
No bachelors 27
No HS degree 35
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 46
Below poverty (last 12 months) 46
Disability 80
No computer 69
No broadband access 40
No subscription 75
Overall average 71

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Todd County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 83

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Todd County ranks 83 out of 87 counties for digital equity. They have been working on better broadband for many years. That means there is local expertise and community engagement but it also means there are issues that are hard to address – like ranking 86 for computer ownership and 79 for broadband subscription rates. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Todd County Ranking
Access to 100/20 48
No bachelors 81
No HS degree 83
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 66
Below poverty (last 12 months) 61
Disability 69
No computer 86
No broadband access 61
No subscription 79
Overall average 83

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

More resources:

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp Brainerd Lakes Area Talent Recruiter Launch Project support to launch a talent recruitment program to market the area’s technology services industry jobs to ensure a highly qualified workforce is available to the region’s business community
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp Enhanced Marketing of Our Technology Sector Project support to implement the Tech Services marketing plan
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp High-Tech Center Research and “Next Steps” Outline Project support to determine the feasibility/strategy to create and sustain a high tech Live/Work Center in the Brainerd Lakes region
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp Tech Ready Brainerd Lakes Area Hackfest Project support for a two-day hack fest to share information, use local skills to problem solve local challenges, and develop new technology solutions
Brainerd Lakes Area Development Corp Video Conferencing System Capital support for video conferencing equipment for use by area businesses and organizations in CTC Technology Room at the BLAEDC/Chamber Offices
Consolidated Telephone Co. & Region Five Dev. Commission Economic Impact of Broadband Infrastructure Expansion & Subscription Project support to measure the changes in the lives of new CTC broadband customers who are now benefitting from a fiber expansion project supported by the DEED Border-to-Border Broadband grant program
Essentia Health Foundation Launch Telehealth Development & Implementation Project support to provide tele-health training sessions in Resilient Region Five’s five-county area and on the Leech Lake Reservation
ISD 181 – Brainerd Public Schools CTC Schools Technology Bundle Project support for technology and mobile devices in the Early Childhood and Family Education programs
MN State Community & Tech College-Wadena “What the Tech?” Technology Expo Project support to host a one-day tech expo event in Wadena that will combine active learning by MNSCU students and displays and seminars for the general public
The Brainerd Baxter Youth Center PCs for People Youth Project Project support to continue to train youth to refurbish computers and distribute them to low-income families in the Brainerd area
Todd-Wadena Electric Cooperative Rural Broadband Feasibility Study Project support for a feasibility study to extend broadband services to the under and un-served areas of the Todd Wadena Electric Cooperative service area

 

Stevens County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 25

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Stevens County ranks 25 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Stevens County ranks well overall because their ranking for broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up is 2! Their other rankings are not as good. That’s an opportunity to use broadband to improve educational attainment or lower poverty rates. The good news is that they have been working on digital equity, so they have the local expertise and community engagement.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Stevens County Ranking
Access to 100/20 2
No bachelors 13
No HS degree 18
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 41
Below poverty (last 12 months) 62
Disability 25
No computer 21
No broadband access 28
No subscription 33
Overall average 25

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Chokio-Alberta Public Schools Chokio-Alberta Schools Project support to prepare students to work in a technology-based future through exposure to career opportunities and insight into the necessary skill sets for those jobs
Hancock Public Schools Chromebooks for School and Community Project support to provide technology training to students and community members
ISD 2769 Morris Area School One to the World Project support to fully integrate technology into classrooms for each learner through internet access and mobile devices

 

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation. (Stevens County participated in multiple Blandin cohorts.):

Chokio Alberta Public School Broadband Upgrade Chokio Alberta Public School District 771 will increase its broadband speed from 3Mbps to 6Mbps and provide four additional Internet wireless routers on the Chokio campus by December 31, 2011.
Hancock Public  Library Increase Broadband Access and Education The Hancock Community Library will purchase one laptop computer and its associated support equipment for use within the Library. The laptop will be available to recognized community organizations at no cost for workshop and training purposes, when not being used by the Library. Atomic Learning software will be included on the laptop for online training purposes for the public and the library staff.
Hancock Public School Broadband Upgrade Hancock Public School District 768 will increase its broadband speed from 3Mbps to 10Mbps.
Midwest Special Education Cooperative Online Speech Therapy Midwest Special Education Cooperative will 1) provide Internet-based speech therapy and other special education services to students in nine West Central Minnesota Public School Systems (Browns Valley, Chokio-Alberta, Clinton-Graceville-Beardsley, Cyrus, Hancock, Herman-Norcross, Morris Area, West Central Area, and Wheaton) and 2) collect system use data (individual and grouped student achievement results, hours used, service delivered, etc.) to measure the effectiveness of this new service delivery model. The data will be used to establish the effectiveness and possible future uses of Internet delivery of special education services.
Morris American Legion Walter Trip Community Internet Center The Walter Tripp American Legion Post 29 in Morris will become a community Internet center with public access computers, a community “Wi-Fi” hot spot and teleconferencing (large wide screen HD monitor, camera, etc.). The Walter Tripp Community Internet Center will be available to recognized community organizations at no cost for workshop and training purposes. The public access computers will be available during normal business hours and the Walter Tripp Community Internet Center will provide a location to “marshal” all of the community’s mobile learning labs (multiple lap top computers with their associated support equipment such as printers, etc.) when the need arises to have access to multiple computers.
Morris Area Chamber of Commerce Chamber Service Improvements The Morris Area Chamber of Commerce (MACC) will 1) add two computers and associated equipment to provide support for the Chamber’s existing communication/information system and 2) provide coordination between various communities through online collaboration.
Morris Area School District Increase Broadband Service in Education Provide wireless routers at various locations in the school building. Embracing rather than prohibiting individual student electronic devices enhances their learning experience.
Morris Area Community Education Mobile Laptop Lab Morris Area Community Education (MACE) will purchase 10 laptop computers and associated support equipment (storage unit, printer, etc.) for its and the Morris Area School System’s (MAS) use. These laptops will be available to recognized community organizations at no cost for workshop and training purposes, when not being used by MACE or MAS. Atomic Learning software will be included on some of the laptops for online training purposes for MACE and MAS staff and the public.
Morris HRA HRA Website The Morris Housing and Redevelopment Authority (MHRA) will establish a website for the City of Morris Public Housing Program that provides all Morris Public Housing Program documents (applications, etc.) and up-to-date guidance and educational information for past, current, and prospective public housing tenants and other interested parties. MHRA will also provide the public with computer access for the Morris Public Housing Program.
Morris HRA Rental Housing Info The Morris Housing and Redevelopment Authority (MHRA) will establish a website for the Morris Housing and Redevelopment Authority Rental Housing Licensing Program to provide up-to-date inspection results, guidance and educational information to past, current, and prospective tenants, landlords, and other interested parties. The website will also have online versions of all landlord/tenant Rental Housing Licensing Program documents (applications, etc.). MHRA will provide the public with computer access for the Morris Rental Housing Licensing Program.
Morris Public Library Library Laptop Lab The Morris Public Library will purchase six laptop computers and associated equipment for use within the library. When not being used by the Library, these laptops will be available to recognized community organizations at no cost for workshop and training purposes. Atomic Learning software will be included on the laptops for online training purposes. In addition, a space and resources within the library will be provided to create a business and career work center.
Resource Connections County-wide Wireless Access Points Resource Connections will permanently install at least one public access computer and one wireless router along with the associated software and support equipment for a community “wireless WI-FI hot spot” in each of the five incorporated cities of Stevens County. Resource Connections will provide a three-year Internet subscription to each of the five public access computers and wireless routers, which will be available to the general public at no cost.
Stevens County Historical Society Digital Conversion Stevens County Historical Society (SCHS) will become a globally-connected resource by providing its collections and records on its website, including cemetery records and the 20,000+ photo collection and digital images of artifacts and archives. Wireless routers will be installed in the upper and lower meeting spaces and the lecture space at the Museum and a public access computer station for web access and training for staff and public use.
Stevens Forward Website Improvement Project Stevens Forward will provide county-wide coordination involving public entity website development and updating throughout Stevens County. The websites will include at least one county government site, five city government sites, one chamber of commerce site, one county economic development organization site and one Resource Connections site.

 

 

 

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
Carlton County Carlton County Robust Network Feasibility Study Project support to conduct a feasibility study to understand options for improving broadband infrastructure and services within the county
City of Cloquet Makerspace Hot Spots Project support to provide Cloquet and Moose Lake libraries with makerspace equipment and training, and six mobile hot spots to provide home access for un- and underserved residents of the County
City of Moose Lake Connect Moose Lake Project support to expand the Moose Lake Community Digital Messaging System to other community entities enabling them to broadcast messages to  the public
Cloquet Public Library “Appy Life“ Library iPad Training project Project support to provide mobile technology, Wi-Fi access and training to staff, county residents and visitors of the three Carlton County libraries
ISD 94 (Cloquet) iPads for Lifelong Learning Project support for technology training and resources for enrichment activities and parenting skills to pre-K students and their families
Moose Lake Community Schools Rural Education Community Utilization Expansion Project support to provide mobile devices to two rural school districts to increase educational attainment and to provide technology training through community education
Moose Lake Community Schools School Bus Wi-Fi Hot Spots Capital support to equip school activity busses with Wi-Fi to provide access for students to be able to work on homework assignments when travelling long distances

 

Steele County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 14

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Steele County ranks 14 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Steele County ranks well overall because their ranking for broadband at speeds of 100 Mbps down and 20 up is 3! Their other rankings are not as good. That’s an opportunity to use broadband to improve educational attainment or lower poverty rates.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Steele County Ranking
Access to 100/20 3
No bachelors 32
No HS degree 53
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 34
Below poverty (last 12 months) 33
Disability 26
No computer 36
No broadband access 1
No subscription 16
Overall average 14

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Stearns County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 31

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Stearns County ranks 31 out of 87 counties for digital equity. They are in the top third ranking. Their ranking for technology (broadband access at 19, computer ownership at 25 and broadband subscription at 29) are higher than other demographic tracts, such as poverty rate (rank 78). There’s an opportunity to find ways to use technology to help lift up those rankings both to attract funding but also to make a difference in the community.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Stearns County Ranking
Access to 100/20 19
No bachelors 22
No HS degree 61
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 68
Below poverty (last 12 months) 78
Disability 28
No computer 25
No broadband access 44
No subscription 29
Overall average 31

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Sibley County Digital Equity Profile – ranked 53

Every year, the Blandin on Broadband blog does County Broadband Profiles (and will do again when the new maps come out) but given federal opportunities are making it possible to get funding for access and adoption, I thought I’d try to present information for counties to assess their digital equity standing (see table below) and give options for who to contact locally for more information.

Summary

Sibley County ranks 53 out of 87 counties for digital equity. Their ranking is all over the place, ranking 19 for population living below poverty and 68 for graduation rates. It’s hard to pick one area that needs help or can lead the way. They are in a position where they need to work on the three pillars of digital equity: affordable access to broadband, device ownership and the skills to use them. The good news is that they have been working on digital equity, so they have the local expertise and community engagement.

Scroll down for details and suggested resources for more information.


Blandin Foundation is using the Microsoft Digital Equity Tool to determine needs by county and make high level recommendations for next steps to consider based on the data. (With special thanks to Carter Grupp, Broadband Coordinator Broadband Coordinator at American Connection Project for Otter Tail County.) Visit the tool if you want to look up more statistics on your community.

Demographic Data and Ranking (out of 87)

Sibley County Ranking
Access to 100/20 45
No bachelors 75
No HS degree 68
Below 150% poverty (last 12 months) 22
Below poverty (last 12 months) 19
Disability 15
No computer 61
No broadband access 18
No subscription 73
Overall average 53

The map below shows digital inequity by census tract. The bluer the better; yellow and orange colors indicate more inequity. This map can be helpful in figuring out which parts of your county need the most help.

So where do you go to talk to people in the county about digit equity plans? Good places to start include:

Libraries

Schools

Regional Development Commission

There’s a lot to take in but sometimes it’s also helpful to see what a community has done in the past, so we’ve gathered specific projects funded through the Blandin Foundation:

Project Owner Project Name Description
City of Gaylord Tech Center Marketing and Planning Project Project support to market the concept of tech centers/maker spaces across the Renville/Sibley Fiber area and determine the feasibility/market demand/next steps in the development process
Gibbon Fairfax Winthrop Schools ISD 2365 Wi-Fi on Buses Project support to outfit school buses with Wi-Fi to enable more productive use of student time on long bus rides to and from school activities, and to use those busses to provide free Wi-Fi at community events
Joseph R Brown Heritage Society Community Applications Project support to create an e-marketing platform and tourism apps for communities in the Renville/Sibley Fiber Project area
Joseph R Brown Heritage Society Community Wi-Fi Project Capital support to create 26 Wi-Fi hot spots in five communities in Renville and Sibley counties
Sibley County Business and Resident Computer Training Project support to provide computer and online technology training to area residents and businesses
Sibley County Marketing in a Digital World Project support to connect local businesses with high school students to increase the online activity of the businesses and provide real-life training opportunities for students
Sibley County Website and Social Media Development Project support to provide one-on-one consulting assistance to local small businesses as they develop and implement enhanced online presence and social media strategies