Senator Carla Nelson outlines improvements tele mental health and broadband

The Post Bulletin shares Senator Carla Nelson’s blueprint for mental health, including an update on improvements in telehealth…

We made several other key advancements this session to improve the speed and effectiveness with which Minnesota provides support to Minnesotans working to improve their mental health.

This year’s final health and human services bill contained important funding that will help us accomplish this goal:

  • We permanently expanded Telehealth access to include mental health and substance use disorders. I have long been an author of Telehealth legislation, beginning with the very first telehealth bill, and we will continue to pursue advancements so every Minnesotan has affordable access to the health services they need, when and where they need them.

  • We provided funding to prioritize the mental and behavioral health needs of Minnesota youth, and established individual treatment plans for children in outpatient services. This was part of the YOUTH Act that I authored this year to help Minnesota better support children in crisis.

  • We provided additional funding in this year’s jobs and economic growth bill to expand broadband access in underserved and unserved communities to help close gaps in access to important services like telehealth.

A closer look at telework recruitment efforts such as Bemidji’s 218 Relocate

The Register Citizen takes a closer look at Bemidji’s 218 Relocate program, a program to recruit teleworkers to the area…

Earlier this year, they [potential new residents, the Fahrenbruchs] saw a job possibility for his wife with the city of Bemidji. But he didn’t see anything for himself. Then, he read about Bemidji’s 218 Relocate program, which offers $2,500 to help cover moving or telecommuting expenses for people who move to Bemidji from more than 60 miles away and bring a job with them, Minnesota Public Radio news reported.

So he pitched the idea to his boss. He could telecommute for his job — with the Kansas Legislature — from Bemidji, Minnesota.

But they are just one story..

The Fahrenbruchs are one of 22 families who have qualified so far for the relocation program since it began in February. It’s run by the economic development organization Greater Bemidji, with funding from a local foundation and Paul Bunyan Communications.

Greater Bemidji hatched the idea for an incentive to help lure people to town before the pandemic, but assistant director Erin Echternach said they launched it after hearing stories of people teleworking from cabins in the area last year after COVID-19 lockdowns went into effect.

Better broadband is a seller…

A key part of Bemidji’s sales pitch is its high-speed internet. Paul Bunyan has built one of the largest rural, all-fiber broadband networks in the country in north-central Minnesota.

“For them to move up to their cabin, and then connect with us and say, ‘I get better internet service at my little cabin in Bemidji than I do down in Maple Grove, Minnnesota,’ that was pretty special,” said Echternach. “And that’s when 218 Relocate was born.”

218 Relocate is one of several resident recruitment programs that have sprouted up around the state in recent years, with names like the “Get Rural” initiative in western Minnesota, “The Good Life” campaign in the north-central part of the state, and “Live Like a Local,” in Grand Rapids.

 

Most affordable towns to work remotely from in Minnesota

Minneapolis St Paul Business Journal reports on most affordable places to work from home in Minnesota…

The ranking comes from New York-based financial and technology company SmartAsset.

To compile a list of the most affordable places to live in Minnesota, the tech company used a variety of factors, including taxes, homeowner insurance and home costs relative to local median income. (You can see the full list here.)

The list of Minnesota’s most affordable places is below:

  1. Montevideo
  2. Redwoods Falls
  3. International Falls
  4. Ostego
  5. Hibbing
  6. Austin
  7. St. Michael
  8. Virginia
  9. Albert Lea
  10. Litchfield

These affordable towns are in a good position to recruit residents and businesses to their location, especially since COVID has moved many people to remote work options and opened the door to living anywhere. So I wanted to take a look at these cities and their broadband ranking – or at least the ranking of their county. Turns out they are all over the place from 31 to 85. Some of the towns listed would definitely rank higher than their county. Monticello, for example,  has a municipal fiber network; Austin has been talking about broadband for years; Redwood Falls was focused on broadband 10 years ago. I’d say, however, that having good broadband and being affordable might boost a community to the top of a “potential new home” list.

City County Affordability Rank Broadband Rank (100/20)
Montevideo Chippewa 1 37
Redwood Falls Redwood 2 85
International Falls Koochiching 3 60
Ostego Wright 4 31
Hibbing St Louis 5 44
Austin Mower 6 35
St Michael Wright 7 31
Virginia St Louis 8 44
Albert Lea Freeborn 9 32
Litchfield Meeker 10 72

 

 

 

 

Nurse Licensure Compact would allow MN to ease licensure for telehealth

The Duluth New Tribune posts a column on health care and how to remove a barrier to make telehealth easier…

First, Minnesota should join the national Nurse Licensure Compact. When the pandemic hit, Minnesota needed all the qualified medical professionals it could get, but licensing proved to be an obstacle to qualified health care workers from outside the state putting their skills to use here. Gov. Tim Walz eventually signed an order allowing health care workers licensed in other states to work in our state, but a permanent solution would be for our state to join the national Nurse Licensure Compact.

The compact allows a nurse to have one license in their primary state of residence with authority to practice in person or via telehealth in other compact states, with the requirement that they follow the nurse practice act of each state. As the Minnesota Board of Nursing says, the compact “advances public protection and access to care through the mutual recognition of one state-based license that is enforced locally and recognized nationally.” At present, 34 states are members of the compact.

OPPORTUNITY: I’m thankful for broadband because… #MNthanks2broadband campaign

In a meeting yesterday we talked about how the holidays are a great time to recruit expats. After life in quarantine, folks are looking forward to a traditional holiday season with family and old friends. After life in quarantine, many folks are still working online, which means they might be ripe for permanent return to their hometown. So it’s time to put our best foot forward. You bake the best pumpkin pie and maybe get the Vikings to win a few games. Collectively maybe we can talk up broadband around the state with quick videos or pictures.

The idea is to create, collect and share content throughout the holidays season making the point that with great broadband, you can live anywhere – so why not here? I got the ball rolling below. It took exactly 2 minutes to do. I recorded myself on a Zoom and uploaded to YouTube. But you could also do a selfie video or have a friend record you. You could post it on YouTube and send me the link OR send me the video and I’ll post on the BlandinonBroadband channel. (Just email me and we’ll figure it out atreacy@treacyinfo.com.)

Or join us for the Special Lunch Bunch on Tuesday November 23 at noon and we can record some then. Or contact me and we can set up a time to do a Zoom video. We can share as we build!

Innovate 218 supports Innovation in Northeast Minnesota

Tech.mn is writing a series on innovation in Minnesota. In Northeast MN, they have focused on  Innovate 218, an organization that focused on promoting and facilitating entrepreneurialism in the area. If you’re a regular reader, you’ll see some familiar names or folks who are involved…

Finding these startups and providing them with a one-stop shop for resources is what Innovate 218 is all about.

“These organizations in the region already existed — small business development, universities — but it’s bringing us together so we’re a more holistic, cohesive resource for entrepreneurs,” White said. “Together we’re stronger.”

An entrepreneur himself having started six companies, White admitted that it previously was confusing to access resources. Now, with funding from Launch Minnesota to create Innovate 218, it’s much more approachable and gives access to services in one place, he said. 

“It’s been a great catalyst for bringing these groups together,” White added. “It’s not necessarily that we’re creating much ‘new,’ but organizing it in a way that makes it more accessible.”

“We’re full-on in the launch phase,” Tamara Lowney, President of the Itasca Economic Development Corporation (IEDC), said of the region’s efforts to build a platform for entrepreneurs where they can get the resources they need.  

And more…

Betsy Olivanti of NSBDC had similar sentiments. “There are a lot of creative folks and a lot of interesting things going on, [but] they don’t know how to get from idea to creation,” she said. 

In her work — which she comes to with an engineering background, ISO certification, and lean certification — she’s noticed that folks tend to think of themselves as “inventors” instead of “entrepreneurs.”

“My work at Innovate 218 is to marry those two things. You are an entrepreneur as well — [it’s] bringing the two sides together,” Olivanti said.

Olivanti and Lowney are both working to bring entrepreneurs out through multiple initiatives: entrepreneur meetups, pop-up coworking spaces at a local coffee shop in Virginia, MN called “jellies,” and events like the Itasca Summit. Innovation was one of the key tracks at this economic development summit, which was held in Grand Rapids October 19 and 20. It brought together state and regional leaders working to inspire and support more innovation and startup entrepreneurship in the region.

One of the organizations participating in the Itasca Summit was the Blandin Foundation, which is a highly influential organization in the region on many fronts, and is a major contributor and supporter of the Itasca Business Development Corporation.

EVENT Nov 17: Tekne Awards Online

The Tekne Awards celebrate Minnesota companies – emerging and established – that have made innovative technology work. On Nov 17, they will announce the winners of the 2021 awards. Here’s the line up for the afternoon:

Wed, Nov 17 Virtual Celebration

3:45 p.m. Arrivals and Pre-show. Meet this year’s Finalists and greet your colleagues and friends online. Get set for a great celebration!

4:00 p.m. Awards program begins:

Award Grouping: Business Enablement thru Technology

  • AI/Machine Learning
  • Data Analytics
  • Data Security
  • Digital Marketing
  • Digital Transformation
  • Edge Computing & IoT

Lifetime Achievement – Joy Lindsay, StarTec Investments

2021 Scholarship Recipients

Award Grouping: Innovation in Minnesota’s Leading Industries

  • Financial Services Technology
  • Healthcare Information Systems
  • Medical Technology & Devices
  • Sustainable Resources

Rising Star Awards

Public Service Honorees

Lifetime Achievement Award – Mike McNamara, Target Corporation

Award Grouping:  Vibrant Tech Ecosystem

  • Technology Partnership
  • Tech Talent
  • Tech for Good

5:30 p.m. Celebration concludes

Videos on online school from kids who were OK with it and kids who weren’t

The National Urban League released 13 short videos about young people’s experiences with online schooling during the pandemic. This is a little bit off my usual post but I thought it was interesting. In the interviews kids who were OK with online school talk to kids who were not. At least one was not OK because he lacked access but for most the platform just didn’t work for them.

I think it’s important that we look at what works with technology and what doesn’t and unfortunately, I think we may have more opportunities to work on online schooling in the future. Changes in technology or teaching may help. Adequate access to technology would certainly help. We might new teaching models, new models for tele-mental health services as well as all of help with equity issues unrelated to technology.

I hope they do a follow up to see how the disconnected kids are doing in a few months. In my house we’ve gone from disconnected to nearly complete rebound since going in person in September – but we’ve got a lot of tools at our disposal. I hope many of the other kids who didn’t love online school will be able to turn it around too. It could lead to an interesting discussion on societal changes based the abrupt worldwide change in education.

Congrats to Winnipeg – 2021 Intelligent Community of the Year

Intelligent Community Forum (ICF) reports…

For the first time since 2016, the Intelligent Community Forum honored a Canadian city with its top award today when it named Winnipeg, Manitoba as its 2021 Intelligent Community of the Year. Winnipeg is a veteran of the Intelligent Community Awards program, having been previously named a nine-time Smart21 Community and four-time Top7 Community since first entering the program in 2011.

“Over the past nine years, we have watched Winnipeg evolve in its strategy and the maturity and interconnectedness of its programs,” said co-founder Louis Zacharilla, who led the award ceremony. “Like so many of the Intelligent Communities of the Year, it is a mid-size city proud of the diversity of its people, its economy and its cultures. There is much to learn from their example.”

I have two daughters that attend college in Winnipeg. It’s an interesting city. The public art is amazing, some fabulous food, hockey of course.

Even food needs better broadband – well farmers need to growing food efficiently and sustainably

Benton Institute for Broadband & Society has just released an important look at The Future of American Farming Demands Broadband. They start by making the case that farmers need broadband is to be more efficient and the environment needs it to support sustainability. I suspect most readers here understand (or live) that, so I’ll cut to some of the answers they provide based on various facets of farming…

The Farm Office
How do we ensure that farmers get reliable, symmetrical broadband service?

● Establish future-proof performance standards: To meet the growing demand among farmers for both upstream and downstream speeds, networks must be capable of 100/100 Mbps service.

● Clarify rules around easements and rights of way: State governments can address legal uncertainty around easements and rights of way, which can slow deployment and increase costs, particularly for electric cooperatives.

Incentivize build-out to the operations center: Broadband funding programs can reward applicants that deploy broadband to the operations center of the farm and other critical farm buildings.

● Support open-access, middle-mile networks: Middle-mile deployment can pack a powerful punch by bringing scalable, fiber-based connections deep into rural communities while also lowering the cost of last-mile deployment for private providers.

The Field
How can we address the special connectivity demands of farms?
● Adopt high-performance standards: Performance standards for upload speeds and latency should reflect the changing needs of farmers for precision agriculture.
● Encourage deep fiber build-out: Fiber build-out in rural America, even if not directly to the farm, will be needed to support capable wireless connections for higher-bandwidth applications in the field.
● Address gaps in mapping on farmland: Broadband maps should include mobile coverage on agricultural lands. The underlying data that informs these maps must be available to the public.
● Advocate for interoperability and privacy standards: Without better coordination about interoperability and privacy standards, farmers may be less willing to adopt precision agriculture technologies.
● Adjust spectrum award mechanisms to reward farmland coverage: Spectrum auctions can adopt geographic coverage requirements in some rural agricultural areas to encourage deployment on farmland.

The Community
How do we connect the communities that farms rely upon?
● Adopt comprehensive state broadband plans: State plans that encompass all aspects of a broadband strategy—including deployment, competition, and digital equity—are best suited to meeting states’ regional economic development and other goals.
● Support digital equity programs at the state and local levels: Digital equity programs led by state and local governments and backed by federal funding can work with communities to help people make full use of broadband connections.
● Encourage local planning and capacity building: Federal and state funding can encourage local planning and capacity building, which may include developing local or regional broadband strategies and applying for federal broadband grants.
● Implement accountability measures: Federal funding programs for broadband deployment that include strong accountability measures ensure that providers hit their deployment goals.
● Encourage local, community-oriented providers: Federal programs that support broadband can encourage entry from more broadband providers, including cooperative and community[1]based solutions.
● Facilitate federal, tribal, state, and local coordination: All levels of government should work together as partners to create opportunities for collaboration.
● Coordinate efforts of federal agencies: A coordinated effort between federal agencies will allow those agencies to synergize their respective expertise and meet the distinct needs of farmers.

I appreciate the collection of statistics and the frontline stories that give a clear picture of what life is like for farmers in rural America. Each town, farm and person’s perspective may be different based on where they are, what they are doing and even season or time of day but it’s very likely that whatever they are experiencing is different that what folks in urban areas experience. Through examples, theygive some quick lessons on fixed-wireless (pg 9), middle mile (pg 11), cooperatives (pg 12), Starlink (pg 14) and more.

They even give a nice nod to what’s happening in Minnesota and Blandin’s role in the success…

Public and private leadership working in tandem in Minnesota
One of the earliest state grant programs, Minnesota’s Border-to[1]Border Broadband Development Grant Program, was created in 2014 to assist localities, private providers, nonprofits, and cooperatives in building out broadband infrastructure in Greater Minnesota. The program funds up to 50 percent of the cost of a last-mile or middle[1]mile broadband project, including planning, permitting, construction, and installation costs. Since its inception, Border-to-Border has connected more than 56,000 homes, businesses, and anchor institutions to broadband. The eventual goal of the program is universal, “border-to[1]border” broadband coverage across Minnesota. The state plans to achieve universal 25/3 Mbps coverage by the end of 2022 and universal 100/20 Mbps coverage by the end of 2026.

Working in tandem with state broadband efforts, the Blandin Foundation, a private foundation dedicated to building healthy, inclusive rural communities in Minnesota, has partnered with dozens of rural communities to help them get and use better broadband. Participating communities work through a proven process to define their technology goals and measure current levels of broadband access and use. They receive technical assistance and grant funding to implement projects that help close the digital divide and take advantage of the extraordinary benefits of a broadband-enabled economy.

Communities that have participated in the Blandin Broadband Communities program have earned themselves a seat at the table of broadband planning. Having done the work of assessing what they have, what they want, and what they are willing to contribute to a possible project, they have a voice in what broadband solution is “good enough” for their communities.

Nearly half of the network feasibility studies commissioned by Blandin community partners and funded by the foundation have been either fully or partially built. Participating communities have dramatically increased the presence of free, publicly available internet access in libraries, public parks, downtown areas, and township halls, and have distributed more than 2,300 refurbished computers to income[1]qualifying residents in participating rural communities across Minnesota. Communities also have implemented a variety of digital literacy programs for local residents and businesses. They have spurred more sophisticated use of technology through education, training, community events, learning circles, and innovative partnerships—a total of 292 projects that address community technology goals.
Local governments and other entities across the state have endorsed and adopted Minnesota’s Broadband Vision, first articulated at a 2015 Blandin Broadband conference: “Everyone in Minnesota will be able to use convenient, affordable, world-class broadband networks that enable us to survive and thrive in our communities and across the globe.” This vision inspired the creation of the Minnesota Rural Broadband Coalition, which unites dozens of broadband champions from across the state to sustain broad, bipartisan support for Minnesota’s broadband grant program.
Blandin’s work in Minnesota illustrates the benefits of public and private leadership working in tandem. Investing in the capacity of communities to name and claim their own broadband vision helps to maximize public benefit from public investments such as state grant programs.

Arrowhead Intelligent Region shares Blandin-funded broadband projects

Grand Rapids Herald Review reports

People living in Northeast Minnesota will have new opportunities to connect and strengthen their communities with the help of eight Arrowhead Intelligent Region (AIR) initiative grants. Nearly a half million dollars have been granted this year through the AIR program to propel community aspirations around digital access and use.

“Despite this stressful, uncertain year, rural leaders in the Arrowhead Region continue to roll up their sleeves, creating more opportunities for community connection and growth,” said Tuleah Palmer, Blandin Foundation president and CEO. “Their tenacity and courage to forge new, digitally-connected paths for all people living in the region is inspiring.”

They offer a sampling of projects that have been funded…

Itasca Economic Development Corporation is creating a new space in Itasca County for job training, developing career pathways for youth and supporting budding entrepreneurs with the help of a $50,000 AIR grant. Working with regional partners, new programming in manufacturing, trades and engineering will be available to community members. Future training will be developed to build the skills of local people needed for digital-based careers.

With support from a $50,000 AIR grant, The Lighthouse Center for Vital Living will help alleviate loneliness and isolation among Arrowhead seniors by increasing access to, and use of, technology. Engagement groups will be created in collaboration with organizations regionwide to offer new ways for seniors to connect.

Sixty to eighty small businesses in the Arrowhead Region will work with the Small Business Development Center to find ways to better use technology to increase revenue or simplify processes. A $50,000 grant will give participating businesses access to funds to make changes that grow their business.

A full list of AIR funded projects can be found at https://blandinfoundation.org/programs/broadband/arrowhead-intelligent-region/.

Rural communities attract teleworkers with good broadband and programs – like in Bemidji

The Daily Yonder reports on a growing migration to well wired rural communities…

Priscilla Bergstrom and her husband decided to leave Denver, Colorado, after 30 years and move to a rural community with a slower pace of life, a lot of outdoor activities, and a fast internet connection. They settled on Bemidji, Minnesota, one of many smaller towns and rural communities that are beginning to employ incentives designed to lure remote workers just like the Bergstrom family to make them their new home.

The found Bemidji through 218 Relocate…

While perusing the local newspaper, Bergstrom came across information about 218 Relocate, a recently launched program to attract remote workers to Bemidji, Minnesota, population 15,000. The program attracts remote workers through various incentives, including up to $2,500 in reimbursed expenses for moving; free co-working space; and access to a program connecting newcomers to established residents. …

In the case of 218 Relocate, it wasn’t an attempt to replicate another community’s success, but instead capitalize on the connectivity that Bemidji has, Erin Echternach, assistant director of Greater Bemidji Economic Development, which runs the program, told The Daily Yonder.

“We were trying to come up with a program that really capitalizes on that fiber-optic Internet,” she said.

Since its launch at the beginning of February of 2021, 18 people have taken advantage of the program so far, with three more scheduled to receive the relocation grant by the end of October, Echternach said.

“We’re really a regional hub for Northern Minnesota and people are just finding out about us,” she said. “And when they get here, they’re surprised at what’s here. But there are some that literally have thrown a dart at the map and they’re like, oh, Bemidji, let’s try it. They love it.”

For Bergstrom and her husband, who was able to relocate his job to Minnesota because he works for a global company, the opportunity for outdoor activities attracted them to the area. They also considered an incentive program in Northwest Arkansas, she said.

Greater Bemidji is piloting the program for two years, Echternach said. And so far they have been pleased. Program participants must physically move to Bemidji, she noted, but they are able to live within a 60-mile radius of Bemidji proper.

CentraCare Health Systems (St Cloud) gets $230,000 for telehealth

St Cloud Times reports

U.S. Senators Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith announced Tuesday the Federal Communications Commission awarded CentraCare Health Systems more than $230,000 for telehealth services.

The funding will be used to purchase telehealth equipment and software licenses to increase access to care and services, according to a press release.

“Americans have benefited from telehealth during the pandemic and have come to rely on it for access to care, especially in rural communities,” said Klobuchar in a statement. “This funding will help CentraCare Health System expand its services and meet the needs of its patients. I’ll continue pushing for resources to ensure Minnesotans in all parts of our state are able to access affordable, quality health care.”

Land O’Lakes say farming is going digital – but need broadband

Venture Beat reports on a presentation that CTO Land O’Lakes Teddy Bekele gave at a conference this week…

“The life of the farmer is very complicated,” Bekele said in his conference presentation. The modern farmer operates in a business ecosystem that includes equipment manufacturers, chemical companies, food distributors, banks and insurance companies, employees, and government regulations.

The success of a farming business, he said, revolves around 40 “mega decisions” about what and when to plant, when and how to fertilize, feed, and harvest, and how to market and sell. These are all problems data and technology can help solve, Bekele said.

The costs of technology and technology upgrades can be an issue, but so is broadband…

One fundamental challenge is that even where solutions exist and farmers are eager to take advantage of them, the lack of broadband connectivity in rural areas gets in the way of tapping into the cloud. Bandwidth is often mediocre in the farmhouse and poor-to-nonexistent at the farm or out in the field, Bekele said. One promising solution Land O’Lakes has been pursuing in cooperation with internet providers is working with the cooperative’s network of agricultural retailers in farming communities to erect more towers for cellular bandwidth.

FCC Commits Over $1.2B in First Emergency Connectivity Funding Wave ($19M in MN)

The FCC reports

The Federal Communications Commission today announced that it is committing $1,203,107,496.88 for 3,040 schools, 260 libraries, and 24 consortia that applied for support from the $7.17 billion Emergency Connectivity Fund Program.  This first wave of funding commitments will provide students, school staff and library patrons in all 50 states and Guam, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia access to the devices and broadband connectivity they need to support their off-campus education needs.   The funding will support 3,081,131 devices and 774,115 broadband connections and help connect over 3.6 million students who, according to their schools, would otherwise lack devices, broadband access, or both. More details about which schools and libraries will receive funding can be found here: https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DOC-376028A2.xlsx.  Interested applicants can still seek program funding starting on September 28.

Minnesota organizations received $19,830,464.06. I know the table won’t format well here – but it’s here for search sake and you can also open the info in Excel.

State Congressional District Applicant Type City Equipment Obligated $ Services Obligated $ Total Obligated $
MN Congressional District 1 School District OWATONNA $15,249.80 $38,505.60 $53,755.40
MN Congressional District 1 Library System ROCHESTER $400,000.00 $219,670.00 $619,670.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District ADAMS $14,152.00 $0.00 $14,152.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District CALEDONIA $43,706.00 $0.00 $43,706.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District HOUSTON $32,000.00 $0.00 $32,000.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District LE ROY $8,820.00 $0.00 $8,820.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District LEWISTON $38,900.00 $9,600.00 $48,500.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District MABEL $31,310.30 $0.00 $31,310.30
MN Congressional District 1 School District STEWARTVILLE $14,950.00 $0.00 $14,950.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District SPRING VALLEY $22,117.20 $0.00 $22,117.20
MN Congressional District 1 School District ALDEN $54,720.00 $0.00 $54,720.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District BUTTERFIELD $5,832.00 $7,920.00 $13,752.00
MN Congressional District 1 School District WORTHINGTON $480,000.00 $0.00 $480,000.00
MN Congressional District 1 School WINONA $11,938.50 $0.00 $11,938.50
MN Congressional District 1 School District HOUSTON $4,800.00 $1,802.40 $6,602.40
MN Congressional District 1 School District WINONA $27,969.95 $2,399.40 $30,369.35
MN Congressional District 1 School FARIBAULT $20,416.44 $9,600.00 $30,016.44
MN Congressional District 1 Consortium Mankato $132,789.00 $447,700.00 $580,489.00
MN Congressional District 1 Consortium Adams $22,117.20 $0.00 $22,117.20
MN Congressional District 2 School District COTTAGE GROVE $716,800.00 $59,330.40 $776,130.40
MN Congressional District 2 School District FARMINGTON $0.00 $34,947.50 $34,947.50
MN Congressional District 2 School District HASTINGS $0.00 $17,600.00 $17,600.00
MN Congressional District 2 School District LAKEVILLE $0.00 $56,250.36 $56,250.36
MN Congressional District 2 School District RED WING $383,849.00 $72,000.00 $455,849.00
MN Congressional District 2 School District ROSEMOUNT $0.00 $136,350.00 $136,350.00
MN Congressional District 2 School District SOUTH ST PAUL $39,330.00 $34,800.00 $74,130.00
MN Congressional District 2 School District MENDOTA HEIGHTS $358,900.00 $0.00 $358,900.00
MN Congressional District 2 School District JORDAN $260,700.00 $0.00 $260,700.00
MN Congressional District 2 School District SHAKOPEE $0.00 $46,433.52 $46,433.52
MN Congressional District 2 School District MAZEPPA $280,885.40 $0.00 $280,885.40
MN Congressional District 3 School District LONG LAKE $0.00 $10,800.00 $10,800.00
MN Congressional District 3 School District MINNETRISTA $1,800.00 $9,117.60 $10,917.60
MN Congressional District 3 School District PLYMOUTH $0.00 $36,000.00 $36,000.00
MN Congressional District 3 School District BLOOMINGTON $0.00 $49,500.00 $49,500.00
MN Congressional District 3 School BROOKLYN PARK $119,731.50 $0.00 $119,731.50
MN Congressional District 3 School MINNETONKA $76,800.00 $9,000.00 $85,800.00
MN Congressional District 3 School MAPLE GROVE $102,900.00 $0.00 $102,900.00
MN Congressional District 3 School Victoria $9,025.75 $0.00 $9,025.75
MN Congressional District 4 School SAINT PAUL $64,717.00 $0.00 $64,717.00
MN Congressional District 4 School SAINT PAUL $19,788.00 $0.00 $19,788.00
MN Congressional District 4 School District STILLWATER $1,611,600.00 $96,000.00 $1,707,600.00
MN Congressional District 4 School District NORTH SAINT PAUL $0.00 $67,704.00 $67,704.00
MN Congressional District 4 School District WHITE BEAR LK $128,375.00 $23,520.00 $151,895.00
MN Congressional District 4 School District ROSEVILLE $114,780.00 $126,000.00 $240,780.00
MN Congressional District 4 Library System WOODBURY $0.00 $94,080.00 $94,080.00
MN Congressional District 4 School SAINT PAUL $10,000.00 $0.00 $10,000.00
MN Congressional District 4 School SAINT PAUL $10,378.00 $0.00 $10,378.00
MN Congressional District 4 School District ST PAUL $19,200.00 $0.00 $19,200.00
MN Congressional District 4 School SAINT PAUL $87,549.00 $4,320.00 $91,869.00
MN Congressional District 4 School SAINT PAUL $938,000.00 $119,880.00 $1,057,880.00
MN Congressional District 4 School ST PAUL $40,900.00 $0.00 $40,900.00
MN Congressional District 4 School SAINT PAUL $158,123.50 $0.00 $158,123.50
MN Congressional District 4 School ST PAUL $10,485.00 $0.00 $10,485.00
MN Congressional District 4 School ST PAUL $0.00 $33,412.80 $33,412.80
MN Congressional District 4 School ST PAUL $23,460.00 $0.00 $23,460.00
MN Congressional District 4 School WHITE BEAR LAKE $16,822.50 $0.00 $16,822.50
MN Congressional District 4 School St. Paul $47,340.00 $0.00 $47,340.00
MN Congressional District 4 School SAINT PAUL $29,300.00 $0.00 $29,300.00
MN Congressional District 5 School MINNEAPOLIS $22,061.70 $0.00 $22,061.70
MN Congressional District 5 School BROOKLYN CENTER $35,440.00 $0.00 $35,440.00
MN Congressional District 5 School District MINNEAPOLIS $77,850.00 $0.00 $77,850.00
MN Congressional District 5 School District COLUMBIA HEIGHTS $0.00 $34,375.00 $34,375.00
MN Congressional District 5 School District MINNEAPOLIS $0.00 $92,112.00 $92,112.00
MN Congressional District 5 School District MINNEAPOLIS $0.00 $288,000.00 $288,000.00
MN Congressional District 5 School RICHFIELD $74,800.00 $0.00 $74,800.00
MN Congressional District 5 School MINNEAPOLIS $40,000.00 $0.00 $40,000.00
MN Congressional District 5 School BROOKLYN CENTER $201,960.00 $0.00 $201,960.00
MN Congressional District 5 School MINNEAPOLIS $95,450.00 $0.00 $95,450.00
MN Congressional District 5 School MINNEAPOLIS $55,350.00 $0.00 $55,350.00
MN Congressional District 5 School MINNEAPOLIS $43,367.50 $0.00 $43,367.50
MN Congressional District 6 School COLD SPRING $90,610.80 $0.00 $90,610.80
MN Congressional District 6 School District FOREST LAKE $498,000.00 $0.00 $498,000.00
MN Congressional District 6 School District ANNANDALE $100,031.40 $0.00 $100,031.40
MN Congressional District 6 School District BECKER $411,600.00 $0.00 $411,600.00
MN Congressional District 6 School District BUFFALO $527,046.00 $0.00 $527,046.00
MN Congressional District 6 School District HOWARD LAKE $0.00 $4,004.88 $4,004.88
MN Congressional District 6 School District MAPLE LAKE $48,000.00 $9,000.00 $57,000.00
MN Congressional District 6 School District WACONIA $145,596.50 $40,080.00 $185,676.50
MN Congressional District 6 School District ANOKA $0.00 $163,440.00 $163,440.00
MN Congressional District 6 Library System BLAINE $22,657.00 $63,504.00 $86,161.00
MN Congressional District 6 School District COLD SPRING $0.00 $15,000.00 $15,000.00
MN Congressional District 6 School District SAINT FRANCIS $900,000.00 $486,438.00 $1,386,438.00
MN Congressional District 6 School COLOGNE $140,000.00 $23,194.80 $163,194.80
MN Congressional District 6 School BLAINE $47,014.00 $0.00 $47,014.00
MN Congressional District 6 School HAM LAKE $50,000.00 $0.00 $50,000.00
MN Congressional District 7 School WABASSO $21,953.33 $0.00 $21,953.33
MN Congressional District 7 School District ASHBY $47,514.00 $0.00 $47,514.00
MN Congressional District 7 School WHITE EARTH $47,909.00 $0.00 $47,909.00
MN Congressional District 7 School E GRAND FORKS $35,074.05 $0.00 $35,074.05
MN Congressional District 7 School District WINDOM $43,174.50 $4,700.00 $47,874.50
MN Congressional District 7 School District PIPESTONE $201,447.28 $4,682.17 $206,129.45
MN Congressional District 7 School District SLAYTON $24,000.00 $0.00 $24,000.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District BROWNS VALLEY $11,360.80 $0.00 $11,360.80
MN Congressional District 7 School District MONTEVIDEO $31,120.00 $0.00 $31,120.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District REDWOOD FALLS $0.00 $3,760.97 $3,760.97
MN Congressional District 7 School District ALEXANDRIA $731,175.00 $36,180.00 $767,355.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District BRANDON $114,634.75 $0.00 $114,634.75
MN Congressional District 7 School District MELROSE $163,895.00 $0.00 $163,895.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District SAUK CENTRE $201,750.00 $14,493.60 $216,243.60
MN Congressional District 7 School District BRECKENRIDGE $43,684.65 $8,194.20 $51,878.85
MN Congressional District 7 School District CLIMAX $4,000.00 $0.00 $4,000.00
MN Congressional District 7 School FERGUS FALLS $5,975.00 $0.00 $5,975.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District FOSSTON $27,485.00 $0.00 $27,485.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District TWIN VALLEY $110,000.00 $0.00 $110,000.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District ERSKINE $66,000.00 $0.00 $66,000.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District ROTHSAY $30,715.00 $0.00 $30,715.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District ULEN $7,200.00 $0.00 $7,200.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District UNDERWOOD $53,820.00 $0.00 $53,820.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District BAGLEY $299.90 $17,635.59 $17,935.49
MN Congressional District 7 School District CROOKSTON $69,010.50 $7,198.20 $76,208.70
MN Congressional District 7 School District FISHER $30,000.00 $0.00 $30,000.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District WARROAD $120,000.00 $0.00 $120,000.00
MN Congressional District 7 Consortium HUTCHINSON $562,285.35 $22,860.00 $585,145.35
MN Congressional District 7 School District BAUDETTE $26,799.00 $0.00 $26,799.00
MN Congressional District 7 School District OKLEE $48,443.00 $0.00 $48,443.00
MN Congressional District 7 School HUTCHINSON $73,000.00 $5,935.68 $78,935.68
MN Congressional District 8 School District CAMBRIDGE $154,102.00 $0.00 $154,102.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District HINCKLEY $93,135.00 $0.00 $93,135.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District LINDSTROM $319,482.00 $6,000.00 $325,482.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District AURORA $28,787.50 $0.00 $28,787.50
MN Congressional District 8 School District CARLTON $154,000.00 $0.00 $154,000.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District CHISHOLM $0.00 $11,695.52 $11,695.52
MN Congressional District 8 School District COLERAINE $37,831.43 $28,896.00 $66,727.43
MN Congressional District 8 School District CROMWELL $0.00 $10,807.50 $10,807.50
MN Congressional District 8 School District MCGREGOR $7,170.00 $10,745.28 $17,915.28
MN Congressional District 8 School District WRENSHALL $95,745.50 $0.00 $95,745.50
MN Congressional District 8 School District LITTLE FALLS $334,900.00 $69,752.88 $404,652.88
MN Congressional District 8 School District MILACA $142,810.00 $17,100.00 $159,910.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District SWANVILLE $47,280.00 $10,800.00 $58,080.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District UPSALA $70,547.50 $0.00 $70,547.50
MN Congressional District 8 School District BRAINERD $938,700.00 $0.00 $938,700.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District DEER RIVER $20,000.00 $6,600.00 $26,600.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District LITTLEFORK $11,292.00 $23,594.23 $34,886.23
MN Congressional District 8 School District NORTHOME $56,274.00 $0.00 $56,274.00
MN Congressional District 8 School WARBA $41,250.00 $0.00 $41,250.00
MN Congressional District 8 School District VIRGINIA $25,820.00 $6,357.00 $32,177.00
MN Congressional District 8 School ISANTI $24,278.00 $0.00 $24,278.00
MN Congressional District 9 School District DILWORTH $160,350.00 $1,440.00 $161,790.00
$16,407,642.98 $3,422,821.08 $19,830,464.06