More info on federal broadband maps

The NTIA is working with 8 states on creating better broadband maps; Minnesota is one of those states. It’s good news but I have to admit I hadn’t read too much on what was going to make those maps better. But I learned a little more from Law360 today…

The federal agency charged with leading an expansion of broadband mapping data is treading “new ground” by planning to incorporate crowdsourced information into its outlines, National Telecommunications and Information Administration head David Redl said Tuesday. …

Last week, USTelecom announced a separate pilot that will amalgamate data in Virginia and Missouri from sources like real estate parcels, U.S. postal addresses and crowdsourced coordinates aligned with satellite images to give an address-level picture of which individual properties lack internet access.

The group said it will use the services of model-development firm CostQuest to map both states in this way, and it hopes to hand the system off to the Federal Communications Commission later. Right now, the federal government relies primarily on data that broadband providers submit twice a year through a mechanism called Form 477.

As agencies cooperate to combine existing broadband maps with new inputs, data gathered through private initiatives will also become helpful, Redl said.

“We welcome the work that USTelecom is doing, and we hope they’re going to be willing to share that data with us as a layer to our broadband map,” he said.

Addition after kid reminder – you can test you speed in MN here: https://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/broadband/checkspeedmn/ 

This entry was posted in Building Broadband Tools, MN by Ann Treacy. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ann Treacy

I have a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science. I have been interested or involved in providing access to information through the Internet since 1994, when I worked for Minnesota’s first Internet service provider. I am pleased to be a part of the Blandin on Broadband Team. I also work with MN Coalition on Government Information, Minnesota Rural Partners, and the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

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