Sen. Franken Presses FCC Chair to Delay Vote to End Net Neutrality Amid Reports of Corrupted Public Comment Period

 A press release from Senator Franken…

Computer Bots May Have Filed Hundreds of Thousands of Comments with FCC over Proposal to Gut Net Neutrality

WASHINGTON, D.C. [12/04/17]—In light of reports that computer bots may have unfairly skewed the net neutrality debate, U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) pressed Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai to delay a December 14 vote that would unravel net neutrality safeguards and dramatically alter the internet as we know it.

A recent report revealed that computer bots filed hundreds of thousands of comments to the FCC during the net neutrality policymaking process, potentially corrupting the public comment period. In response, Sen. Franken and a group of his colleagues sent a public letter today calling on Chairman Pai to delay the net neutrality vote until an investigation into the matter is conducted.

“A free and open Internet is vital to ensuring a level playing field online, and we believe that your proposed action may be based on an incomplete understanding of the public record in this proceeding,” wrote Sen. Franken and his colleagues. “In fact, there is good reason to believe that the record may be replete with fake or fraudulent comments, suggesting that your proposal is fundamentally flawed…we are requesting that you delay your planned vote on this item until you can conduct a thorough review of the state of the record and provide Congress with greater assurance of its accuracy and completeness.”

The letter, which you can read here or below, was led by Sen. Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.).

December 4, 2017

The Honorable Ajit Pai
Chairman
Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street Southwest
Washington, DC 20554

Dear Chairman Pai:

We are deeply concerned by your recently released proposal to roll back critical consumer protections by dismantling the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) current net neutrality rules. A free and open Internet is vital to ensuring a level playing field online, and we believe that your proposed action may be based on an incomplete understanding of the public record in this proceeding. In fact, there is good reason to believe that the record may be replete with fake or fraudulent comments, suggesting that your proposal is fundamentally flawed.

To this end, we request a thorough investigation by the FCC into reports that bots may have interfered with this proceeding by filing hundreds of thousands of comments. Furthermore, an additional 50,000 consumer complaints seem to have been excluded from the public record in this proceeding, according to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests filed by the National Hispanic Media Coalition.  Without additional information about the alleged anomalies surrounding the public record, the FCC cannot conduct a thorough and fair evaluation of the public’s views on this topic, and should not move forward with a vote on December 14, 2017.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has spent the past six months conducting an investigation into the fraudulent comments, and found that “hundreds of thousands” of comments may have impersonated New York residents, a violation of state law. He further asserts that the FCC has not cooperated with requests for additional data and information. Data scientist Jeff Kao has also run an analysis of the public record, and estimates that over a million comments filed in support of repealing net neutrality may have been fake. These reports raise serious concerns as to whether the record the FCC is currently relying on has been tampered with and merits the full attention of, and investigation by, the FCC before votes on this item are cast.

A transparent and open process is vitally important to how the FCC functions. The FCC must invest its time and resources into obtaining a more accurate picture of the record as understanding that record is essential to reaching a defensible resolution to this proceeding.  As a result, we are requesting that you delay your planned vote on this item until you can conduct a thorough review of the state of the record and provide Congress with greater assurance of its accuracy and completeness.

Thank you for your immediate attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

###

This entry was posted in MN, Policy by Ann Treacy. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ann Treacy

I have a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science. I have been interested or involved in providing access to information through the Internet since 1994, when I worked for Minnesota’s first Internet service provider. I am pleased to be a part of the Blandin on Broadband Team. I also work with MN Coalition on Government Information, Minnesota Rural Partners, and the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

2 thoughts on “Sen. Franken Presses FCC Chair to Delay Vote to End Net Neutrality Amid Reports of Corrupted Public Comment Period

  1. Senator Amy Klobuchar also signed the letter to the FCC asking to delay the Net Neutrality vote. It’s great that both of our Senators signed this letter, and they both deserve to be acknowledged.

  2. Thanks for the heads up. Senator Klobuchar has done a great job supporting rural broadband; I’m always happy to acknowledge her work. I just might need to get on her press release distribution list!

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