Schools have the devices but not necessarily the bandwidth for classroom use

A recent article in Information Age says…

“The internet provides schools with an invaluable resource for teaching and learning, but without effective Wi-Fi it can’t be used to its full potential,” said Paul Hennin, senior director of international marketing at Aerohive Networks. “When teaching resources can’t be loaded, or programmes stall and crash, this eats into children’s learning time. Schools cannot afford to fall behind in digital learning.”

IT Managers realize there’s a problem

Despite 92% of survey respondents recognising the importance of high-quality Wi-Fi for the learning experience of students, only 41% had deployed Wi-Fi with enough visibility and control to do so. According to the research, while access to budgets remains competitive, investment in Wi-Fi and bring your own device (BYOD) connectivity solutions will be a major priority for a large proportion of IT managers in 2016.

But not enough have been done to remedy the problem…

However, only 42% of respondents said they have the controls in place to manage this influx of new devices, and a lack of network intelligence means many cannot meet their school’s Wi-Fi demands. Consequently, nearly all (95%) respondents said teachers and students aren’t satisfied with school Wi-Fi systems.

It’s a little indicative of the issue of technology planning – there are multiple layers – you need the equipment, the connectivity and the continued access.

This entry was posted in education by Ann Treacy. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ann Treacy

I have a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science. I have been interested or involved in providing access to information through the Internet since 1994, when I worked for Minnesota’s first Internet service provider. I am pleased to be a part of the Blandin on Broadband Team. I also work with MN Coalition on Government Information, Minnesota Rural Partners, and the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

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