A Community of Resources to Boost Broadband Adoption

Last week the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) hosted a webinar – It Takes a Community to Bridge the Digital Divide. The webinar provided background and some practical advice, especially for anchor institutions (or any institution who might work with folks who aren’t currently using technology) on how to promote broadband use. Here’s the description from the webinar website, if gives more context:

In FCC Chairman Genachowski’s announcement of the sweeping Connect2Compete initiative to increase broadband connectivity and Internet access across the nation, he listed an impressive array of partners who are joining in the effort. Although he singled out libraries as “vital centers for digital literacy,” any effective actions must involve the whole community of players. Join us to hear about the key role that the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is playing in the broadband adoption challenge and the actions already underway for building digital communities. And also hear insights on the collaborative roles and efforts of city/county governments and public and private organizations. Learn how to get started with inclusion efforts from organizations who have taken the steps to implement practical programs which meet local needs and share your ideas about collaborative efforts which lead digital inclusion.

The best part of the website to me is the list of Resources and Links Referenced. Librarians are great for annotated lists!

This entry was posted in Conferences, Digital Divide by Ann Treacy. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ann Treacy

I have a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science. I have been interested or involved in providing access to information through the Internet since 1994, when I worked for Minnesota’s first Internet service provider. I am pleased to be a part of the Blandin on Broadband Team. I also work with MN Coalition on Government Information, Minnesota Rural Partners, and the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

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