Benton Institute offers concise info on the Affordable Connectivity Program

The Benton Institute for Broadband & Society has done a nice job detailing the Affordable Connectivity Program from angle of provider and recipient, or at least to help a recipient. I remember working a Reference Desk and working with patrons to try to figure out how to sign up for various government programs; it’s not as easy as it looks and that’s while I was sitting in the warm library getting paid. It’s nice to have something that outlines the details. 

Here’s the high level info but the value in the document is the level of detail and which detail depends on what you need…

Broadband providers will receive up to $30/month (or up to $75/month if the household is on Tribal Land[1] or in a “high-cost” area) for providing service to low-income households. Broadband providers pass on those savings to low-income subscribers. If the provider offers and the consumer picks a plan that regularly costs $30/month or less, the consumer will receive that service for free until Affordable Connectivity Program funding ends. (With more than $14 billion for the Affordable Connectivity Program allocated in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and approximately half of the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program funding rolled into the new program, the benefit should be available for years to come.) The service can be standalone broadband or a bundle of services including broadband, telephone, texting, and the rental fee on the equipment that makes the service possible (like a modem).

The government will also give a broadband provider up to $100 if a household purchases one of the provider’s connected devices (laptop, desktop, or tablet computer). The consumer can be asked to pay no more than $50 and no less than $10 for the device. A household can only buy one of these discounted devices and there is no discount on smartphones. A connected device must be Wi-Fi enabled and support video conferencing. A device cannot be limited to use with any specific service provider and a provider may not require consumers to obtain an program-supported device in order to enroll in the Affordable Connectivity Program.

As in the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program, the FCC sets no minimum service standards for internet service offerings that are eligible for Affordable Connectivity Program support. The FCC says only that the service must include a broadband connection that permits households to rely on these connections for the purposes essential to telework, remote learning, and telehealth.

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