AT&T stops DSL services – leaving areas with less competition

USA Today reports

On Oct. 1, AT&T stopped selling digital-subscriber-line connections, stranding many existing subscribers on those low-speed links and leaving new residents of DSL-only areas without any wired broadband.

“We’re beginning to phase out outdated services like DSL and new orders for the service will no longer be supported after October 1,” a corporate statement sent beforehand read. “Current DSL customers will be able to continue their existing service or where possible upgrade to our 100% fiber network.”

This comes in the shadow of a recent report from NDIA on AT&T’s position based on “An analysis of AT&T’s 21-state network, an August 2020 survey of CWA members, and reports by local advocates in AT&T’s service area,” which reports…

The analysis of AT&T’s network reveals that the company is prioritizing network upgrades to wealthier areas, and leaving lower income communities with outdated technologies. Across the country, the median income for households with fiber available is 34 percent higher than in areas with DSL only — $60,969 compared to $45,500.

A much older report (2016 Industry Analysis and Technology Division Wireline Competition Bureau) that demonstrates that DSL was a rural solution; cable was more prominent in urban settings.

AT&T Wireless is a big player in Minnesota; their wired services are not. But it’s worth watching how this plays out, especially to see if other providers follow in similar footsteps.

This entry was posted in Digital Divide, Vendors by Ann Treacy. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ann Treacy

Librarian who follows rural broadband in MN and good uses of new technology (blandinonbroadband.org), hosts a radio show on MN music (mostlyminnesota.com), supports people experiencing homelessness in Minnesota (elimstrongtowershelters.org) and helps with social justice issues through Women’s March MN.

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