Telehealth use doubles between 2016 and 2017

According to Multi-Briefs Exclusive

Telehealth use rose by more than 50% from 2016 to 2017, according to a new white paper by Fair Health. For the annually released paper, data was collected from the company’s records of 28 billion commercial insurance claims, which showed that telehealth utilization grew nearly twice as fast in urban areas vs. rural over that span.

Nationally, urgent-care centers increased their use of telehealth by at least 14%, followed by retail clinics at 7% and ambulatory surgery centers at 6%. Emergency department utilization of telehealth declined, though, by 2%. However, utilization in this setting was still the most used.

Also on the upswing was utilization by private insurance claims for telehealth services, increasing more than 1,200% from 2012 to 2017. Likewise, the use of telehealth is outpacing all other sites of care, the report says.

In 2017, most people used telehealth for injuries like bruises and open wounds, acute respiratory infections and digestive problems. Mental health, which topped the telehealth utilization list in 2016, was fifth in 2017 at 7% of claims, compared with 13% for the aforementioned uses. Per the report, pediatric visits and young adults were well-served, but the age 31 to 60 demographic continued to use it the most.

And interesting note – Minnesota was one of the top telehealth claim reporters in 2016 – but not in 2017. IN fact none of the top users in 2016 were top users in 2017. It shows the speed with which telehealth is catching on.

This entry was posted in Healthcare, Research by Ann Treacy. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ann Treacy

I have a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science. I have been interested or involved in providing access to information through the Internet since 1994, when I worked for Minnesota’s first Internet service provider. I am pleased to be a part of the Blandin on Broadband Team. I also work with MN Coalition on Government Information, Minnesota Rural Partners, and the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

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